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  1. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    109

    Post

    I agree with most of what's already been posted (except therhino who's pissed because his bike got stolen, only the stabilisers were left behind).

    Other tips: move your back hand down the boom and point your front hand away Superman style and bend your knees (which you did for most of it) as you initiate the carve, this will push the rig away from you.

    As you are down wind change your feet to the new side and PUSH the rig around with your back hand, only small well powered, rigs will flick fast enough on their own without aid.

    As already said you're sheeting in far too long, I think this is lack of confidence that makes reluctant to let go of the firm support which the rig normally provides. Accept that when you are dead down wind there is little or no pull in the rig and the board is relying on momentum to keep going, imagine you're a surfer or water-skier who's let go of the tow line, all you need to do is not upset the boards balance and push the rig around, you won't fall off.

    Other than that


  2. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    91

    Post

    2 Old Pete: thanx, "Superman-style" - good explanation. Will try that.

    2 therhino: Sorry about your bike, but sh*t happens


  3. #17
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    12

    Post

    Hi,

    Most of the salient points have been said already, but here goes:

    If this is just your second session gybing then you're a very very fast learner. I've been trying for months and some of my gybes look like the one you posted! That said about 50% of my gybes result in me keeping my hair dry, but I've never managed a carve gybe.

    If you've got a magic video camera and can rewind yourself to the point where you're halfway round that gybe, the biggest problem is not opening the sail as you turn. The board is turning, but your back hand isn't pushing the rig away as the board turns. This means that the power drops off, the board slows, the apparent wind picks up (from behind you), and rips the sail from your hands as you try the flip.

    1) The most helpful advice I can give you is learn how to sail clew first. Pick a low wind day, put up a small sail, and give it a go. To get into clew first sailing, slog along normally, and do a flare gybe (slowly turn through the wind) and sail out clew first. Sail along for as long as you can clew-first, and only flip the rig when you're very comfortable in the new direction.

    2) Rig flipping: Practice this in your backyard with just the rig on a very light day. Practice so you can do it with your eyes closed. Practice so you can let go the boom completely, clap your hands, then grab the boom on the new side exactly where your hands should be. One tip that I found particularly helpful is to grab the new side of the boom palm-up, that way your elbows don't get in the way of each other.

    3) Once you've mastered those, try to put them together. Put the rig flip closer and closer to the point where you turn through the wind, and eventually you might just come out planing.

    Good luck!

  4. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    91

    Post

    2 nebbian: Very good practical advices! Thanx.

    Actually I forgot to mention that I was practicing low-wind jibes before in non-planning conditions. I guess it helped a lot with jumping into a jibe.

    And I have analized my very big mistake which is not on this video: before leg switch I push with front leg too hard when moving back leg, at exactly this moment carving really stops. I should be more light when on the board...


  5. #19
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    15

    Post

    You are not looking too bad, but I think one of your main flaws is leaning back. When you start the gybe, try to lean as far forward as humanly possible, extending your arms and leaning the sail forward. Concentrate on loads of pressure down onto the mast foot as well ( try having the mast foot far forward in the track). And finally, look out of the gybe as you are flipping the rig to keep the board turning. These are the things which hepled me... Lean forward, mast foot pressure and turn the head.

  6. #20
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    1

    Post

    Quote Originally Posted by kimax
    And I have analized my very big mistake which is not on this video: before leg switch I push with front leg too hard when moving back leg, at exactly this moment carving really stops. I should be more light when on the board...
    If you set your back foot up before you start the carve, you will be all set for the carve. Really lean your weight onto the back foot and you will find your front foot becomes much easier to move. This will make your transition more fluid.....


  7. #21
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    91

    Post

    He he, I've got a new board - Fanatic Eagle 114. So next windy session I will be learning it's properties. And then come back to jibing...

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