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Thread: Boom height

  1. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Emile
    How are those gybes coming along?
    Not well... I'm more successful in getting round, but I'm not planing out. I've been sailing smaller boards, though (I was out on my 80 ltr RRD FSW yesterday - loverly!) and I don't know if that's hindering me.

    I should practise gybing more, but with the sudden end to the wind drought, I've been lazy and just bombed along as fast as I can in an ocean grooving sort of way.

    I've got Sunday and Monday free, so I'll spend both days gybing.

    EDIT:

    The boom height question was partly raised about gybing - one of the guys I work with suggested that a lower boom height might help with the gybes, as it would allow me to keep more mast foot pressure through the transition.


  2. #9
    Senior Member lostboy's Avatar
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    Sorry to jump in when you are basher bashing but marking the 135 point and keeping that consistent across lots of boards is easy, it's the footstrap positions relevant to the mastbase that is the issue (this is the triangle with the boom height that you should be re-creating every time you sail). Great to sort it out on one board, it then needs to be standardised on the others:

    - back footstrap Xcm from tail

    - footstrap spread X cm

    - mastbase X cm from tail

    - boom height Xcm past tail when fixed



    I am afraid I will disagree with you about board widths as well. Wider boards need the boom higher because you are further outboard in the straps and therefore further away from the mastbase when sailing and therefore the boom is relatively lower. (Trigonometry!).

    Got an opinion? Great. Guess what, so's everyone else!

  3. #10
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    Lostboy that is interesting and I can't disagree. Is there a formula in here for different widths and types of board?

    When advising a newbie to the sport, what do you think is going to give a more accurate starting point - measuring from the shoulder of off the back of the board? How does it also affect gybing (to get back to the thread...)

    BTW In no way was I bashing basher as to do so would be bad etiquette and I am certain that he knows more than I do about this WS thing.


  4. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lostboy
    The boom off the tail thing only works if you can be sure that your footstraps and mastbase are in exactly the same place, with the same spread, relevant to the tail of the board on each board you sail.


    *

    This is exactly the point and well described by lostboy.

    All these beginners guides to setting positions are redherrings, often making you prioritise things wrongly. The hands width back from the mast along the boom thing to set harness lines is equally distracting.

    In this case, concentrate on where your boom height is first, in relation to say your shoulders or chin when sailing along comfortably in the straps. That;s the starting point. Where the boom falls in relation to tail is then incidental.
    If you want a higher boom then move it up the cutaway or try a mast foot position further back.
    Where the boom then falls in relation to the tail is again incidental.

    On some of my boards the boom sits on the tail, on others it sits behind the tail. I don't care about that I care about the boom height when I'm sailing.

    The 135cms mast foot measurement is equally annoying and often wrong. A good starting point for mast foot position is in the centre of the track that's where the designer put the track as a recommended average. The centre of the track may or may not be at 135cms from the tail or whatever. The better rule of thumb here is to use the front half of the track for bigger sails, in lighter winds, and if you are taller or heavier. For more manoeuvrabilty, use the back half of the track. Experiment on the water, not with the tape measure.
    Now back in the UK.

  5. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by basher
    The 135cms mast foot measurement is equally annoying and often wrong.
    OK but I am person who likes things to feel approx the same each time I go out obviously taking into account variations in sea conditions and wind. I am certainly much less experienced that you are so I am sure you are right.

    The problem is, how do you develop the "feel" that it is right if you do not have something to go on? The 135 measurement I think is a suitable (but not accurate) guide, along with the method of measuring off the back of the board to develop that "feel". I now know when I have got it wrong and when it feels right but this has been developed by using those measurements.

    As it happens, where I set the boom after a few hours sailing is often a little higher than my shoulder on the beach.


  6. #13
    Senior Member lostboy's Avatar
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    Steve,

    Neither of us is saying that the 135cm measurement is wrong, what we are saying is that it is only one of the measurements that I listed that you need to keep consistent to ensure that they feel (and indeed are!) the same every time you go out. Once you have a setting for those four elements then stick with them if that's good for you. I set my boom slightly higher than shoulder but I am a big guy that uses powerful sails and likes to get going early. If it's howling then I may drop it by an inch or two for better control as planing is not an issue then And yes, I have made sure that the measurements are similar between my boards but I do actually sail my Playmate slightly more "upright" than my Goya so the dimensions are slightly smaller (closer from f/strap to mastbase) to account for that!



    Got an opinion? Great. Guess what, so's everyone else!

  7. #14
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    Both the 135 mark and the boom off the tail of the board are meant as a guide to help intermediates advance.

    The problem is that as people are learning, they very rarely can "feel" if everything is setup right. They might feel uncomfortable but be unsure as to whether that is a result of stance or kit setup (and if it is kit setup, what is wrong?)

    I have never said stick your deckplate at 135 and never move it, measure your boom height off the back of the board and leave it there.

    Instead, I think it is a good idea to mark the 135 point to use as a reference point from which to start. It is also useful to remember the height of your boom after a good sail by measuring it off the tail of the board.

    Neither of these things are the be all and end all, they are just a guide and are really intended for those that find guides useful (ie beginners and intermediates)

    As far as the mast track being placed by the board shaper as the recommended average, I have sailed a lot of boards where they mast track seems too far back or too far forward, unfortunately the track is not always put in the right place.

    Graeme: I am not sure that a lower boom will help with mast foot pressure. It's normally easier to pull down on things that are higher than you rather than lower than you... Stick with what feels comfortable. If you are blasting comfortably, the gybes should start to work better. Because you have been without wind for a while, maybe focus on getting yourself sailing really comforatbly over the next few sessions (stance and kit setup wise.)

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