Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 LastLast
Results 15 to 21 of 47

Thread: Boom height

  1. #15

    Post

    Having got this far with boom height detail in this thread, we can now add a warning about boom height 'fascism'. There is no one rule which will suit all.
    I can confess that sometimes I use a high boom and sometimes not (although it's never low).
    I don't find a high boom helps me plane early at all I plane early because I'm light on my feet and use wide-tailed boards in relation to my weight. I find that a lower boom is easier to pump because the action is towards you rather than over your head. The high boom pumping is more like a chin up thing, which helps you to pump the sail whilst popping the hull out of the water at the same time. I find you don't need to go to these extremes if you are on a wider tailed board in the first place.
    The other issue is about unhooking in the lulls. Sometimes in gusty winds you are in and out out the straps and you move forwrads a lot to keep the board planing. This brings the mast more upright and then, with the high boom, it's a bugger to get out of the harness line in a hurry. Sometimes you have to jump out of the harness line to get unhooked. And this is a bit easier with the boom not set so high, even though you are marginal wind sailing where most would recommend a higher boom.

    Another contradiction is for winter sailing. In a full winter wetsuit and in cold weather, I find I get forearm cramps. These are lessened by lowering the boom (perhaps because the heart isn't pumping blood uphill?) and so here you pump more efficiently with a lower boom in cold weather! Or is that just me?
    Now back in the UK.

  2. #16
    Senior Member wully's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Back home in sunny Argyll
    Posts
    231

    Post

    Quote Originally Posted by Emile
    As far as the mast track being placed by the board shaper as the recommended average, I have sailed a lot of boards where they mast track seems too far back or too far forward, unfortunately the track is not always put in the right place.
    I've sailed one or two boards over the years where I thought 'Why did they stick the track so far back/forward?' and felt really uncomfortable on them.

    Do you recon the test pilots are sailing with a weird style or what?


  3. #17

    Post

    Usually board builders stick the mast track in the wrong place because of an obsession with the 135cms measurement.
    Now back in the UK.

  4. #18
    Senior Member lostboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    6,207

    Post

    Quote Originally Posted by wully
    Quote Originally Posted by Emile
    As far as the mast track being placed by the board shaper as the recommended average, I have sailed a lot of boards where they mast track seems too far back or too far forward, unfortunately the track is not always put in the right place.
    I've sailed one or two boards over the years where I thought 'Why did they stick the track so far back/forward?' and felt really uncomfortable on them.

    Do you recon the test pilots are sailing with a weird style or what?
    You've both missed the point. It's not necessarily that they've got the mast-track in the wrong place at all, it is that it is set up wrongly in relation to the footstrap positions FOR YOU! As I've said, the most important distance is the one between mastbase and footstrap position, then the footstrap spread. This sorts the base of the "strap, mastbase, boom end" triangle out. Then, and only then, do you measure to a fixed point on the board, and that is only to establish a fixed reference point to keep it all consistent in the future!

    Got an opinion? Great. Guess what, so's everyone else!

  5. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    150

    Post

    Quote Originally Posted by basher
    Usually board builders stick the mast track in the wrong place because of an obsession with the 135cms measurement.
    On some boards that I have sailed with the track seemingly in the wrong place, the 135 measurement has not even been on the track.

  6. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    150

    Post

    [QUOTE=Lostboy]
    Quote Originally Posted by wully
    You've both missed the point. It's not necessarily that they've got the mast-track in the wrong place at all, it is that it is set up wrongly in relation to the footstrap positions FOR YOU! As I've said, the most important distance is the one between mastbase and footstrap position, then the footstrap spread. This sorts the base of the "strap, mastbase, boom end" triangle out. Then, and only then, do you measure to a fixed point on the board, and that is only to establish a fixed reference point to keep it all consistent in the future!
    Funnily enough, I don't just tend to leave things be. If I think that a track is in the wrong place, I try moving things around to make the setup feel right. On some boards, this just cannot be done I am afraid. Maybe the kit was not desinged for me, but I am 75Kg, average build and just under 6 foot tall.

    Anyway, I am getting side tracked. We are all agreed on one thing: Play around with your setup graeme, find the best and most comfortable settings for yourself and then remember them!

  7. #21

    Post

    Blimey, Emile
    (responding to your first post of those two)
    That bad.
    Which board exactly?
    We see old customs on our beach sometimes where the mast track is way forwards.
    I sail a new board by starting out with the track in the middle and experiment from there. But if something was very wrong from the start then I too would get out a tape measure.
    Now back in the UK.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •