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  1. #8
    Senior Member Silicon Beach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by snappersteve View Post
    I've been thinking about this, would 100ltr FSW be better than pure FS for light winds coast sailing 6m-6.5m
    It depends on your priorities and the type of conditions you usually sail. So for instance:
    prioritise 'proper' freestyle (popping, sliding etc) / flat water - then obviously FS board;
    prioritise wave riding / some waves even if the wind is light - then FW (FreeWave) or possibly a big (Tanker style) wave board;
    prioritise jumping / b & j / some chop or waves even if the wind is light - then (arguably) FSW;
    prioritise blasting / freeride / flat water with some chop - then FSW (or a FreeRide);
    a bit of all the above (or can't decide) then possibly FSW
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    Currently writing the World's first Windsurfing Novel: 'Too Close to the Wind' - watch this space!
    ps check out my musings from El Medano: Life on the Reef
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  2. #9
    Senior Member /Vico's Avatar
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    I'd say that a FSW is better at dealing with chop due to higher nose and narrower tail, while a FS will plane quicker, but the nomenclature is open to interpretation/abuse.
    It is what it is.

  3. #10
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    I've been using a Fanatic FSW 104 with a Naish Force 6.2m as my light wind setup. At 80 kg, I get it planing in 14 knots or so but the setup doesn't have that light easy planing feel and in stop/start light wind its hard to get upwind. The FSW would be better in a bit more wind for a heavier sailor who could bury the rail properly as its a very wavy shape, with a narrow nose and tail.

    Seems like the upwind wont be a problem. I haven't owned a freeride board for about 15 years but I could go upwind well on it then and maybe the skate is more like a freeride than a FSW.

  4. #11
    Senior Member Billyboy's Avatar
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    most boards are hard to get upwind in stop start conditions. If the "start" bit is only just squeaking onto the plane I don't find FS boards easy either as you spend a lot of time going off the wind to try and get planing. I don;t think an Fs will be any easier than you FSW in that respect, assuming you have a reasonably long fin in your FSW?

    I would be arguing with SB's arguable point number 3. FS is more fun for light wind b&j and small waves because its more maneuvrable (both in the air and on the water) and you can get more height in your jumps by using the extra "pop". It also works better with smaller fin and sail which make it even more fun. For me this is where it really stands out against a FSW. Note that I am talking about marginal conditions here, if its reasonably well powered up then FSW comes closer. Certainly if its a wave oriented one like a chakra...

  5. #12
    Senior Member Silicon Beach's Avatar
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    yeah I was thinking more of a Rod-type sailor prioritising jumping when reasonably well powered (say with a 5.7m) somewhere there were some ramps (eg Shoreham with 20 knots SWly & mid tide). In which case, speed and 'get-up-and-go' of a good FSW can equate to max possible air in conventional jumping mode.
    -----------------------------
    Currently writing the World's first Windsurfing Novel: 'Too Close to the Wind' - watch this space!
    ps check out my musings from El Medano: Life on the Reef
    -----------------------------
    Boards: Quatro Supermini Thrusters: 94 & 85
    Sails: Severne Blades.

  6. #13
    Senior Member Billyboy's Avatar
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    You've been away a long time SB - shoreham doesn't have any ramps in 20knt winds, you need closer to 30! Somewhere round the corner will be fun though!

    I agree, in 20knts with lots of chop or any kind waves then you are in FSW territory. It's when it's 15knts or on fairly flat water that the FS comes into its own for non-freestylers

  7. #14
    Senior Member Silicon Beach's Avatar
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    yep agreed ... I must say I've always had some kind of FSW board - even well before they were called that - eg 'wave-slalom' or 'convertible' (had the one that started it: the Copello 265), and I've never actually tried a modern FS board.

    I've still got one of the first JP FS designs (113 from c 2002) - the one with a graphic of Josh Stone with his hair flying, but it's really more what you'd call a freeride board these days (and a pretty good one in fact). So it would be interesting to nip into OTC on the right day and put my 5.7m on a proper modern FS board. Yep, I'll do that one day and then I'll be able to post on a thread like this and actually know what I'm talking about
    -----------------------------
    Currently writing the World's first Windsurfing Novel: 'Too Close to the Wind' - watch this space!
    ps check out my musings from El Medano: Life on the Reef
    -----------------------------
    Boards: Quatro Supermini Thrusters: 94 & 85
    Sails: Severne Blades.

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