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  1. #15
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    I use a 2010 Skate at 90kg for freeride. Using a 29cm Select fin in the board it flies up and down wind. My mate was on a 105 Freewave the other day and couldn't believe how fast it was as he couldn't stay with me and we were on similar 6.5m sails. His comment was "Thought they were supposed to be slow!!"

  2. #16
    Senior Member Southern Surf's Avatar
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    Jan 2006
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    They are fast, but I find that once you are really powered up, you miss having the outside straps and I find my ankles starting to take a bit of strain.
    Waiting for summer....

  3. #17
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    That's because you have a Team version. No such problem on the CWS version :0

  4. #18
    Senior Member /Vico's Avatar
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    Feb 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silicon Beach View Post
    ... I've never actually tried a modern FS board.

    I've still got one of the first JP FS designs (113 from c 2002) - the one with a graphic of Josh Stone with his hair flying, but it's really more what you'd call a freeride board these days (and a pretty good one in fact). So it would be interesting to nip into OTC on the right day and put my 5.7m 4.7m on a proper modern FS board. Yep, I'll do that one day and then I'll be able to post on a thread like this and actually know what I'm talking about
    Corrected typo.

    Freestyle boards, because they are flat and wide, are brilliant for using with a much smaller sail than you'd think adequate. Once you've got them planing as long as you keep them flat with as much surface area in contact with the water then they'll plane with very little power. It doesn't work so well with short chop and you have to be delicate. No Hoss Cartwrights.
    It is what it is.

  5. #19
    Senior Member
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    Nov 2004
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    266
    I have to disagree with the general opinion about using a freestyle board for something other than freestyle. It will generally differ model by model, but a freestyle board will be 1. wider, shorter & with flatter rocker and 2. have rails designed for sliding rather than carving. I don't like using my freestyle board in anything other than really flat water. Jumping it is a ticket to a broken board or painful ankles. It is not as nice for carving manoeuvres as a freeride or FSW board will be.

    It sounds like what you really want is a FSW board?

  6. #20
    Senior Member
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    Apr 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by cob1 View Post
    I have to disagree with the general opinion about using a freestyle board for something other than freestyle. It will generally differ model by model, but a freestyle board will be 1. wider, shorter & with flatter rocker and 2. have rails designed for sliding rather than carving. I don't like using my freestyle board in anything other than really flat water. Jumping it is a ticket to a broken board or painful ankles. It is not as nice for carving manoeuvres as a freeride or FSW board will be.

    It sounds like what you really want is a FSW board?
    The other option is to go to a 95 litre FSW as the 104 (although it goes earlier) just feels a bit too big to work perfectly at my weight.
    The 95 would plane at maybe 15 knots.

    I would like to kite more in light winds but I've been finding the required wind/tide/direction combination often isn't available without a long (possibly wasted) drive, so I would like to get out as much as possible on a 430 masted windsurfer when it isnt suitable for kiting - hence considering the FSW. Maybe a freeride would work but I could end up grooveriding.
    Last edited by boards_ronnie; 29th May 2012 at 02:24 PM.

  7. #21
    Senior Member Billyboy's Avatar
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    Apr 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by cob1 View Post
    I have to disagree with the general opinion about using a freestyle board for something other than freestyle. It will generally differ model by model, but a freestyle board will be 1. wider, shorter & with flatter rocker and 2. have rails designed for sliding rather than carving. I don't like using my freestyle board in anything other than really flat water. Jumping it is a ticket to a broken board or painful ankles. It is not as nice for carving manoeuvres as a freeride or FSW board will be.

    It sounds like what you really want is a FSW board?
    I think its mainly a personal preference thing. I've tried lots of FSW boards and owned a couple and have never really got on with them. They give a "locked in" directional feel that makes them generally a lot less "chuckabout" and means I am less likely to try anything other than just burn and turn. I know you can loosen them up with a small fin, but then I find that by the time there is comfortably enough wind for it I can just be on my waveboard.

    An FS gives you something different. As Nico says you can use a smaller sail (and fin) than you would otherwise which, coupled with the inboard stance, volume distribution and shape make the board feel really "up for it". It's almost impossible to resist chucking yourself into some kind of move or other, or boosting a jump off some chop. It doesn't have to be new school freestyle to be fun.

    I agree they are not great when well powered in chop (other than to get lots of airtime!), but if its that windy you can be on something smaller anyway. The OP was about using them in lighter winds, and for that I find them a lot more fun than a FSW.

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