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Thread: Tacks avoidance

  1. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by boards_Florian View Post
    Don't be lazy, tacking really pays off!
    +1

  2. #16
    Senior Member /Vico's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silicon Beach View Post
    Tacks avoidance ... yep a good idea, but to paraphrase our Dear Leader, is it moral ?
    I had no idea the CIC had said that.

    Quote Originally Posted by Silicon Beach View Post
    Well here's a 'ting ... i know I'm not going to be popular, but personally I don't bother with tacking. ...
    I think you are going to be very popular, or at least in very good company. I last tacked in 2003, and did it so well that I haven't dared try again for fear of failure.
    It is what it is.

  3. #17
    Senior Member Mungo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silicon Beach View Post
    Well here's a 'ting ... i know I'm not going to be popular, but personally I don't bother with tacking. It takes up far too much of the limited energy reserves that I have for wave riding, and I much prefer gybing. OK, if pushed I can do some kind of a tack maybe 30% of the time on my waveboard, but I can gybe something like 95%, and of those, probably over 50% are tasty. Carving through a turn, especially on a wave or swell is what I like doing.
    If I lived and sailed in El Med I probably wouldn't bother either. Onshore at Cabezo it might come in useful, but other than that you can pretty much get away without tacking at all (as evidenced by SB). Camber is another matter though.

    I like to put my front hand fairly low on the mast (to get my body low and rig raked back), my back hand on top of my harness lines (to prevent sheeting too hard and get the rig back) and sail the board through the wind as much as possible. When you make the foot change you need to step as far back as you can and get the new back foot behind the front straps so that you can scissor the board off the wind. Finally, lead with the hands and the rest will follow. You need the rig to be out of the way by the time you step round so get the hands moving early and you'll have all the space you need.

  4. #18
    Senior Member /Vico's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arf View Post

    2: I have noticed that being able to tack quickly and consistently and with style is more likely to get people pointing and whispering (is it a pro etc) than forward loops or backloops. Not that I want to be mistaken for someone who is better than I am, but pointing and whispering is infinitely preferably to pointing and laughing when it comes to observers :-)
    LOL at pointing and whispering. I think they have just noticed that you have your wetsuit on back to front.

    I love the way everybody says tacking is harder than <insert some very hard thing here>. It's tricky, but you won't get Rod spending n years of his life posting a blog about it and it won't score any points in a "wave" contest, even at Pozo.
    It is what it is.

  5. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Arf View Post
    Ha SB, some of the major reasons I want to learn to tack well are:

    1: If it's stupid windy and I can't hope to gybe because it would involve supersonic speed and probably bouncing out, a tack would be infinitely less embarressing than a fielding.
    Loving the fact that a Fielding is now part of regular windsurfing terminology.
    Trying not to work too hard.

  6. #20
    Senior Member Silicon Beach's Avatar
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    Hey look, good luck to all you tackers ... if that's what turns you on, then fine ... and I already said that there were indeed good reasons to tack. For instance, to get waves at Cabezo, yes you do have to tack. All the hot-shot locals can tack 100%, a few inches from the rocks, if they blow it then they're on the rocks getting pounded. There's literally no room to do a gybe on the inside at certain states of the tide (which I tend to avoid).

    Personally when they do that, I'm not "pointing and whispering" as per Arf. It's just a slow, boring, but technically slick way to turn round, no big deal. If you watch videos from other spots (for example Punta Preta) they tend to exit the wave with a boring old gybe.

    What I personally love is the feeling of a planing carve gybe on a big swell, or onto a head high breaking wave, or even laying the sail right down on mega flat water. That's way more fun than a tack, how-ever slick you do it.

    and don't tell me not to be 'lazy'. I'm 60 next year, and I don't windsurf for that kind of sh1t
    Last edited by Silicon Beach; 28th June 2012 at 11:42 AM.
    -----------------------------
    Currently writing the World's first Windsurfing Novel: 'Too Close to the Wind' - watch this space!
    ps check out my musings from El Medano: Life on the Reef
    -----------------------------
    Boards: Quatro Supermini Thrusters: 94 & 85
    Sails: Severne Blades.

  7. #21
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    i can tack my big board no problems, I can tack my longboard (in a spanish marina). I would quite like to mix it up and try a helitack... it sounds fun, if rather pointless... which is my summary of lightwind sailing anyway.

    Tacking is a useful skills for when those boards are the water- especially for keeping upwind or trying to get out the way of a motorboat. But when it comes to using less volume in more wind, then really tacking is simply not on my agenda. I'm spending far more time trying to gybe smoothly, and I doubt very much that when that nut is cracked I'll be returning to windy tacking. So Silicon Beach / Nico... one day I hope to be able to join you on your plateau, at the moment I'm clinging to a rock halfway up and badly need some coaching or a few pointers to get this gybing sorted, although no doubt some guru would have me correcting my bad tacking habits/technique first.

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