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  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    Your best thinking on catching waves?

    Picking the right wave, getting on to it and knowing when to turn dtl are important but difficult challenges for any wave sailor. Unless someone can point me to existing threads covering such topic, I would wellcome your thoughts!
    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 25th January 2015 at 06:49 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Mark D's Avatar
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    Not my thinking but a useful starting point for further discussion.
    (Apologies if you have already seen it)
    I like the bus top idea and the suggestion to get on other wave riding equipment.


    http://boards.mpora.com/how-to/wanna...pLZ4oeLSirY.97
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  3. #3
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    Wave selections, for me, very difficult to put into words. I know what a good one looks like to a point, but describing how to tell? Different spots require different selection criteria, plus your frequently not after what's the best wave if your polakow, but wanting one that's the right size and difficulty for you. At the bench in kbay for example I'll let a lot of good stuff go as my timing and skills not up to it and I'll end up with a snapped mast.

    Flailing about for description.

    1. Not the first, let it clean up the water state and fall on that and you'll get a pounding from the rest. Unless it's a crap day then just get riding.
    2.If its a surfing spot as well ride the wave immeadiatly after the nastyest lookin closeout, so the surfer's are swept away, which ever that is. Trying to wavesail through a pack of surfers is no fun for me or them. Edit: Its good practice to take note of where the surfers are as that's be the point you want to end up with a wave when you start your ride.
    3. Bus stop. At most places I've sailed/ surfed there's that place just out the back where waves aren't usually breaking, but are starting to show there bones, is the most crucial to getting a good one. Longer period and more height the better, there is also a shape element I can't describe. One that's going to work looks different. Steeper, hollower? This varies from place to place but there's a commonality between locations as well. Then there's local factors like the variations in the swell direction that'll shape whether it'll work on the bottom of the break just right. Think you can only understand this by watching the waves at the break break and sailing it. It's he heart of local advantage.
    4. The wave will have a peak. You can see where this will be from the earlier ones in the set and its higher and steeper, where this will form you want to be down wave of his by a few foot. Sneaking a few more metres up wind while this forms is good.
    5. When to drop in? I think this is where the deficit between my skill and aspiration is biggest,years of watching the pros on video says the steepest most powerful part, experience says a few foot to metres down wave is good if I want to live as the timings less critical.
    6. After that its all instinct until I wipe out. Knowing when to bail is something I still struggling with. The temptation is always one more turn whether the beach is in the way or theres a monster closeout.

    NB: wave sizes described were based on how they feel, reality is probably a lot smaller.
    Last edited by TallJames; 25th January 2015 at 08:37 AM.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Duncan Adam's Avatar
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    Good points TallJames, I never seem to be at the right spot at the right time, which I only figure out after everything has rolled out.
    2018 Sessions: Speed/Slalom 03, B&J/Wave 02, SUP/WindSUP 00
    2017 Sessions: Speed/Slalom 12, B&J/Wave 09, SUP/WindSUP 01
    2016 Sessions: Speed/Slalom 20, B&J/Wave 23, SUP/WindSUP 03

  5. #5
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    Duncan, That's me to. Some times I cheat and follow Timo or Neil around at kbay. To me there the two most in tune with the place.

    Point breaks are easier than beach breaks, at least they break consistently. Some where like Llangennith where a few degrees difference between set angles means they break in very different locations and styles is much harder. Your effectivrely trying to model 3 or 4 different scenarios and tell them apart.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Duncan Adam's Avatar
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    I got frustrated the last time at Newgale, as I was always way too early, or just a fraction late to the right size wave. More practice required.
    2018 Sessions: Speed/Slalom 03, B&J/Wave 02, SUP/WindSUP 00
    2017 Sessions: Speed/Slalom 12, B&J/Wave 09, SUP/WindSUP 01
    2016 Sessions: Speed/Slalom 20, B&J/Wave 23, SUP/WindSUP 03

  7. #7
    Senior Member Mark D's Avatar
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    Good points guys - I often do the same and follow the guys who are killing it, especially at places I do not know very well.

    Taking the time to observe and learn how a spot is working on a particular day is also an area I need to work on, wave selection is an art, I suppose that is why it is so a consuming sport? I love the way you can get a set that runs through at a slightly different angle making everything even easier. Because I fail to do enough observation I often miss out on the best waves.

    I also try and take the last wave in a set if possible.
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