Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 7 of 18
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    2,488

    ?How to keep the nose down - even in waves?

    (See my question way down this post.)
    If you have spent some time watching other sailors you will have observed that the ones that ride nose high plane late, go slow and stall easily. Thankfully most people gradually learn to keep the nose down on reaches by keeping the sail sheeted on stretched arms and by swinging the head, upper body and hips forwards to transfer weight from the feet and onto the mast foot through the harness lines.


    When it comes to gybing a great majority still cuts off the pull of the sail and the mastfoot pressure too much and too early to keep speed through the transition. The clue here is to really sheet in but with a straight front arm and let the rig pull you over from heels to to toes. And to really swing your hips forwards and into the turn during the rig flip to counter the effect of the reduced mast foot pressure as the rig swings to the outside and back.


    Of the minority of sailors who can gybe well some goes on to try and learn waveriding. I'm one. It's not easy. Again keeping the nose down is key to keep speed. For novices like myself using a board with a fat tail obviously helps keeping the nose down, but comes at the price of a harder rail engagement and a more bouncy ride. And at some point you want to venture out into bigger waves and need sharper rails.


    Which leads me to the QUESTION: What tips can the more advanced wave riders (myself excluded) give for keeping speed up in a wave environment? I've watched a few videos of sailors that are better than myself - and a lot braver - going out in in real waves with good angles, but still struggle a lot with speed. And it's not only about catching the wave, but also about working up enough speed once on it to do the first bottom turn. The picture I have in my head is of someone moving along rather slowly on a waveface with the tail of the board sticking into the wave at the back while the nose hangs out in front. And by the time they have finally managed to get some speed up the wave has often become so steep and close to crashing that it's more a question of trying to escape it than to go down the line. Which can be like asking it to crash on your head. So how do you keep the nose down at all times to get and keep speed?


    (Excuse my long post but I have a bad hip and a nice pin tailed waveboard sitting in my room and no wind or wave in sight. Back from Pozo. I will at some point have to travel far to catch a good wave and I don't want to waste it.)

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    3,876
    whether a board runs nose high or low in my experience largely depends on the rocker line of the board, which is then tuned with mast foot position and fin size/rake.

  3. #3
    Senior Member hayesite's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Middlesex
    Posts
    1,238
    I find taping a couple of house bricks to the nose of the boards helps! ��
    Currently retired to do more windsurfing before the body says NO!

  4. #4
    Senior Member Waterman47's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Cape Town, South Africa
    Posts
    136
    Bend your knees when wave riding. Stiff legged antics are not going to work You noted the technique of straight front arm and a pulling the back arm in into a gybe. Great advice, but all useless if the knees are not bent. As in, almost 90 degrees. 99% of people don't bend enough. When I show them photos of themselves they are shocked, they will swear blindly that they are bending their knees and even argue beforehand.

    Try moving your footstraps more forward. In the old days you were considered cool if your footstraps were very far back, and a noob if they were forward. Forget that. Also try a mast track position slightly further forward. See what works for YOU. Experimentation is key - we are all different. Nowadays I keep my straps forward.

    If you're slow on the face of the wave you're probably underpowered, or didn't enter "correctly". If the swell is slow and your board fast (and you're powered) you can approach from behind a swell, drop down and boom you obviously already have speed. Or, sheet out and let a swell catch up to you and then point downwind and take it. Or the winner of course, gybe on the face of the swell and ride it in. When the swell is still at least 5 seconds or so from breaking, I am already out of the harness, weight over the board and starting to go downwind. I sail sideshore wind 98% of the time so I guess I'm lucky.

    If you can get someone to video yourself on a wave, and a few other skilled sailors at the same spot, same day, you may analyse the footage with an experienced sailor and they would point out the differences. You'll be rocking in no time.

    Don't forget those knees. As you said, leaning back kills the speed. Lean out. Oh, most important. Try longer harness lines and a higher boom. I sail 30 inch line. If I could buy 32 here I would. Personal preference yes, but beginners always start out with short harness lines, and then never try anything else. Give it a bash, for several sessions. Initially it may feel terrible. Even better, get someone to sail your equipment to set it up perfectly

  5. #5
    Senior Member Witchcraft's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Fuerteventura
    Posts
    2,348
    Waterman allready gave some good advice. Video yourself is probably the best advice.

    Tail thickness is of absolute no importance once you are planing and the water does not touch it. A common misconception. Making a tail 1cm thicker will make it look volumous but in fact only adds maybe 1L and since your leverage of your foot to the fins becomes worse, you lose control and maneouvrability. Tail volume is only needed when you stall, at which point the fins donīt work anymore either (an airplane canīt fly without speed) and you need to move forward anyway.

    What helps to keep speed:

    Move your boom up (needing longer harness lines), then it is less needed to bend you knees, the key is to hang on your boom to use it as a 3rd leg.

    straps forward

    planing power of the tail: a wider, longer and less rockered tail, however this makes the board turn less so simply a bigger proper wave board that turns well is often the best solution for learning to wave ride as opposed to learning to sail amongst waves.

    As soon as you go DTL, the apparent wind becomes less or may become zero or even negative (depending on the conditions) In side shore it is lots easier to keep speed than in on shore. In on shore it is essential to keep your sail correct since you need wind power to drive through the turn and for a moment sail clew first. When sailing clew first (with wind in the sail), a looser leach will work against you, increasing power and drag and move the CoE up, wanting to pull you over the front and when this happens you sheet out and the sail pulls you in the wrong direction.

    The problem you describe that people wait for the wave to shape up (before dropping down to gain speed and momentum) and then often are too late is a timing problem, nothing but experience can solve this.
    Bouke
    Witchcraft Windsurfing Fuerteventura

  6. #6
    Senior Member Waterman47's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Cape Town, South Africa
    Posts
    136
    Generating loads of speed here on a very quick wave.... You'll see he was underpowered at a stage there.

    https://www.facebook.com/HotSailsMau...3123966044593/

    If the lip nicks your boom, it's goodnight.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Witchcraft's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Fuerteventura
    Posts
    2,348
    Quote Originally Posted by Waterman47 View Post
    You'll see he was underpowered at a stage there.
    Underpowered? Where??

    This is very extreme, a very fast wave and very off shore. He never had time to make a turn or even an aerial. Not of any use for Thomas.

    What I forgot earlier: moving the mast foot forward will also get it more out of your reach so usually does not help much and may cause an unbalance in other situations (rig raked back too far)
    Last edited by Witchcraft; 8th May 2015 at 01:45 PM.
    Bouke
    Witchcraft Windsurfing Fuerteventura

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •