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  1. #8
    Senior Member Waterman47's Avatar
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    At the 20 second mark, it's obvious. Once he goes higher up on the wave he generates plenty speed and then it's no worries. Sure it's not for him, but the principles are the same, even on this solid wave.

  2. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Waterman47 View Post
    Bend your knees when wave riding. Stiff legged antics are not going to work You noted the technique of straight front arm and a pulling the back arm in into a gybe. Great advice, but all useless if the knees are not bent. As in, almost 90 degrees. 99% of people don't bend enough.
    Do you think I need to go deeper in my knees?

    Thanks for responding guys. I guess that what I'm really wondering is how to readjust from sailing my huge kode wave 87 (in the picture on a tiny onshore pozo day - we had plenty of bigger days before the camera man appeared) to my tiny 86 new wave twin. I didn't really expect any definite answers, but I have earlier found that by asking the forum I begin looking for answers to my own questions and that it helps.

    I do by the way run a very low boom and it has felt ok. I should perhaps also add that I have only sailed the new wave twin twice and with a lot of heavy winter gear. It has also been stupidly onshore. But the board turns so sweetly that I really look forward to get it out in some decent sideshore waves.
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  3. #10
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    It never stops amazing me how technique seems to be the least interesting topic on this forum.

    [QUOTE=Witchcraft;1014041) Tail thickness is of absolute no importance once you are planing and the water does not touch it. ....
    Move your boom up (needing longer harness lines), then it is less needed to bend you knees, the key is to hang on your boom to use it as a 3rd leg.[/QUOTE]

    As with fat people, the (fat) tail of my kode wave is both wide and thick. So it stays planing at lower speeds. And it sinks less when off the plane which helps when getting back on the plane. The new wave twin is both narrow and thin in the tail and therefore much more technical to get and stay planing. Thats why I'm asking advice from the experts about my how to keep the nose down (= how to unweight the tail).

    Tell me more about how a taller boom can help me keep the nose down Bouke. In my thinking a tall boom can help when in the harness. But hardly when out of it. Applying down force through straightish arms is hard work. My intuition tells me it's even harder with a boom way above shoulder level. Not?
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    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 9th May 2015 at 02:00 PM.

  4. #11
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    boards_Tomas,

    You can see what the difference in boom height does in this picture, if you look closely.

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    What do you see?

  5. #12
    Senior Member
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    I see you have a real wave there Harald. What else did you want me to notice? (Isn't it with booms as with people: The little ones are easier to push down?)

  6. #13
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    Your mast hand elbow is flaring out, while mine is pointing down. Imagine how much force you are able to exert on a chin-up bar compared to the start position of this straight arm lat pulldown exercise:

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  7. #14
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    Good point Harald! I often se Carlos (from Cutre shop) doing multiple turns on a slow wave with the elbow (closest to the mast) pointing straight down when he is struggling to keep speed in situation where very few would keep (sort of) planing. But it also depends on where you are in the transition I guess. On entry you want a straightish front arm? So straight arms or elbows down then. Never out. And mast hand closer to the lines than mine I guess.
    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 10th May 2015 at 12:55 PM.

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