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  1. #15
    Senior Member Witchcraft's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boards_Tomas View Post
    It never stops amazing me how technique seems to be the least interesting topic on this forum.



    As with fat people, the (fat) tail of my kode wave is both wide and thick. So it stays planing at lower speeds. And it sinks less when off the plane which helps when getting back on the plane. The new wave twin is both narrow and thin in the tail and therefore much more technical to get and stay planing. Thats why I'm asking advice from the experts about my how to keep the nose down (= how to unweight the tail).

    Tell me more about how a taller boom can help me keep the nose down Bouke. In my thinking a tall boom can help when in the harness. But hardly when out of it. Applying down force through straightish arms is hard work. My intuition tells me it's even harder with a boom way above shoulder level. Not?
    It is not the thickness that makes it stay planing better but width, length (behind the strap) and less rocker. A thicker tail does help if it sinks but a very minor shift of your weight forward will allready make up for this.

    I donīt know but normally it is easier to hang off a higher boom. Here some old pictures of Will Ward, an expert in light winds. He gets lots of speed in the lightest of winds and busts aerials in 12 knots. The biggest sail he uses is a 5.0 and a 78L board with 75kg of weight. You can see there is not a ripple of the wind on the water. When it is light he puts his boom higher to hang off it better when not in the harness. In stronger winds he moves his boom down to have more of his weight on his feet and the wind in the sail will push on the mast foot.
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    Bouke
    Witchcraft Windsurfing Fuerteventura

  2. #16
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    Interesting. I have focused on holding the rig far forward and have wanted the longest possible reach which means boom at shoulder level with bent knees. I feel that holding or even pushing the rig forward works well on entry but as soon as you open the clew I guess you need to bring the mast hand into the body and might as well hang off the boom as in the above picture.

    Late edit: Not sure if it's a common learner error but for me at least it's taken a long time to realize how short the entry phase really is - at least in onshore conditions - and how radically different both body position and rig handling should become as you turn through down wind and start heading clew first upwind towards the lip. The idea of holding the rig forwards has stopped me from really puliing the mast hand back towards the body (or perhaps rather body towards the rig), which has stopped me from opening up the clew by a fair amount.
    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 10th May 2015 at 05:41 PM.

  3. #17
    Senior Member Witchcraft's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boards_Tomas View Post
    Interesting. I have focused on holding the rig far forward and have wanted the longest possible reach which means boom at shoulder level with bent knees. I feel that holding or even pushing the rig forward works well on entry but as soon as you open the clew I guess you need to bring the mast hand into the body and might as well hang off the boom as in the above picture.
    If you move the boom at shoulder level, it is just the weight of the rig keeping the nose down. Normally I have a fairly short distance between front straps and mast track on my wave boards so you hang your body on the boom in light winds where there is hardly any wind giving mast foot pressure.

    Quote Originally Posted by boards_Tomas View Post
    Late edit: Not sure if it's a common learner error but for me at least it's taken a long time to realize how short the entry phase really is - at least in onshore conditions - and how radically different both body position and rig handling should become as you turn through down wind and start heading clew first upwind towards the lip. The idea of holding the rig forwards has stopped me from really puliing the mast hand back towards the body (or perhaps rather body towards the rig), which has stopped me from opening up the clew by a fair amount.
    Wave sails have been getting less loose leach over recent years. A loose leach makes a sail comfortable when sailing in a straight line but it works against you when going clew first. Just imagine how a swept back wave fin would behave if you mounted it with the tip forward. So even in high winds, for wave riding when you have to pull the boom through the wind so the wind enters from the boom side rather than mast side, it helps a lot putting a smaller sail with less loose leach.
    Bouke
    Witchcraft Windsurfing Fuerteventura

  4. #18
    Senior Member Derek Rides's Avatar
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    The traditional method of taming a 'nosey' board is to fit a vert fin, it'll always try and find the vertical and so will keep the nose down and will plane earlier.

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