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  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    124

    Firemove, going upwind.

    Since here is such a collection or savvy people, I will take the chans to learn something more. The Firemove is very nice to move around with, but I canīt go very high. Canīt bank the board over to windward. Of course I could put a big fin on, but than the other feeling will be lost. Any thoughts?

  2. #2
    Do you mean when planing or when slogging?
    I assume the former.

    Going upwind on anything is a function of technique and of how powered up you are, and then, in third place, the longer fin length helps.

    Assuming you are planing, then make sure you are well-powered to help point higher, and add positive outhaul to your rig to get better leach tension which always helps on the upwind legs.

    I'd also suggest you try and move the mastfoot back a touch to get more lift off the fin you have (never forwards, unless overpowered). Moving the mast foot back should help the board want to rail more. But try and sail the board upwind flat. (You only need bury the windward rail in a slogging situation).


    Then there's all the usual technique advice such as aiming for an upwind mark or boat, and looking upwind to where you want the board to go.
    Pinching tight to the wind can be good when going upwind too but not if the board is slowing every time you hit chop etc. So work the board to windward, with your weight well forwards, and try and keep the board moving by snaking through waves or chop. The idea is to optimise speed whilst minimising sideslip.
    This is why upwind work requires more concentration than a more casual reach where you are maybe just the passenger.
    Last edited by basher; 14th May 2015 at 06:11 PM.
    Now back in the UK.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    124
    Thank you! Doing all this, but will try to put the mastfoot back. Thougt that you had to bank the board a little to windward, not bury it. So what do you mean with - working the board to windward?

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    3,876
    What freemoves lack is waterline length and straight rails so upwind technique is a little different to boards that have those credentials. The number one requirement for upwind work is speed so you need to be powered up. It also helps to use adjustable harness lines so you can shorten them a little for upwind work and lengthen then for beam and ( especially) broad reaches. Adjustable outhaul can also help, pulling on a little outhaul to sharpen the foil entry point. The mast foot position is obviously not adjustable whilst sailing and is best set to give the overall optimum performance which may not be optimum for upwind work so you have to work with what you have. Similarly your fin should be selected for overall performance and going too big can drastically reduce your speed and manoeuvrability. What you can do however if choose to use a fin with less rake and provided it is good quality ( has controlled flex and fast reflex) it will be a little harder to carve but better in most other respects, and far better upwind.

    So with all of that in mind it then comes down to technique. Read the water shape and work upwind between the wind blown swell, which will be on the bow; lean forward and raise the windward rail to carve hard into wind in the gusts but release off if the wind eases in order to maintain as fast a speed as possible. Probably already said here, but constantly look high upwind on the basis the rest of your body will follow your head.........plus you need to looking for gusts and trough lines upwind to plan your route.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    124
    Thank you, Mikerb! What do you mean with "raise the windward rail to carve"? Raise in the opposite way of banking the windard rail?

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,247
    Not sailed a Firemove but after a tip from an ex-racer I tilt the board a bit to bury the leeward rail which gives more lift. Once planing in this position start pointing higher, and get your weight forward through mast foot.Only works on boards with sharp rails, and I've only done it on an old 286cm board with big sail where it also helps lift onto the place. Not tried on modern gear which get more lift form fin.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Capie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    842
    Try these things:

    1) Feet in duck position, i.e. back heel pointing forwards towards the front heel. (learned this from Antoine Albeau)
    2) Look upwind (as Basher says) but really focus on a point upwind.
    3) Keep front arm straight, perhaps slightly further forward on the boom than normal.
    4) Bend front leg slightly.
    5) Press through your toes to keep the leeward rail engaged.
    My Boards: 2016 Fanatic Falcon TE 129, 2014 Patrik Slalom 115 vII, 2014 Patrik Slalom 92l, 1992 Windsurfer One Design, 2012 Fanatic Freewave 85l
    My Sails: North Sails Warp f2016 , North Hero, North Volt

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