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  1. #1
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    Why is high boom giving me spin out?

    I rarely get spin out but earlier today I was getting lots. I weigh 88kg, 76l F2 Guerilla wave board, 21.5cm fin, Simmer Iron 5.3m. Only second time I used th sail and rigged boom higher than I was I was used to on other gear. I could feel lots of weight down through harness lines and less on my feet than normal. I was well powered and in 3-4 foot chop getting lots of spin out. I lowered boom a couple of inches (mid-boom now 2/3 up sleeve gap) and no spin out.
    I persevered with high boom as read here it helps with wave sailing, keeping board flat and engaging rail (?), so was good practice even if no real waves. just loads of chop. I did reduce spin-out, but much easier when I lowered boom.
    Why was I getting spin out and lowering boom eliminated problem?

  2. #2
    Do you actually mean spinnout – or is this more about control and 'tail walking'?

    When overpowered on a windy day in ramps and chop it's very difficult to keep the board in the water.

    What dropping the boom then does is put the sail power in front of you in a more comfortable way, and it also puts your body weight over the board tail more, controlling a flyaway board.

    With the fin held down better in the water it will airate less and so spinout less.
    Now back in the UK.

  3. #3
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    Strangely i,ve just had a bit of that on my 84lt board this morning at Shoeburyness on a 30mph southerly day . I put it down to the very close chop i was sailing in ?. My boom is high-ish but i agree with Basher its more tail control when over powered ? rather than spin out .

  4. #4
    Senior Member max111's Avatar
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    that's a big powerful sail for a 76 lt board IMO

    i would say the biggest you can comfortably carry is 5.0m

    let me guess when you sheet in to go upwind you then spin out --- sail is to big and powerful

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the comments.
    It was not tail walking and happened without pattern, such as sheeting in. In line with comment I wondered if high boom led to me sailing so flat air got to the fin in the chop and as commented lower boom led to weighting the tail down into water more.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maker View Post
    Thanks for the comments.
    It was not tail walking and happened without pattern, such as sheeting in. In line with comment I wondered if high boom led to me sailing so flat air got to the fin in the chop and as commented lower boom led to weighting the tail down into water more.
    Possible , depends on so many different things , fin type ,fin to board match, wave conditions ,foot strap position , boom high i guess , maybe just good old fashion to much weight on the back foot in strong winds ?. Difficult to be sure unless i,ve sailed your kit . Thing is, if you sorted it out and had a good sail ? that,s whats most important .

  7. #7
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    A lower boom aids control giving you firmer contact with the board. The reason is that you get the choice to either apply mft through the harness lines or use your weight to keep the board down when pulled up by a gust or when coming out of the harness to jump or gybe etc. Boom height also alters the balance of pressure you apply with your feet. A lower boom increases pressure via the front foot compared to the back foot. There is a boom height that enables you to equally balance the pressure applied by front and back foot. Equal pressure on both feet or 60/40 in favour of the front foot seem to be the most recommended.

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