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  1. #1
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    ?Rig handling for onshore waveriding?

    Late edit: This thread started as a question to the better wavesailors about rig handling. I have received some useful advice but perhaps not exactly what I was looking for. Partly therefore I have taken the liberty to do a lot of speculations on my own. DO NOT ATTEMT TO FOLLOW MY "ADVICES". I'm still far from sure what works and what doesn't and in which conditions. I also suspect that say "pulling in on the mast hand" (= bending the front arm in standard language) can give wildly different results depending on whether you have turned through down wind on your bottom turn or not. Having myself now tasted the back piece of my boom twice, I will proceed with precaution.

    Original post: I'd really appreciate it if someone like OlaH could help us understand how to handle the rig during the clew first phase in frontside riding when the wave is very onshore.

    For me the bottom turn entry works pretty well. But I feel that the clew first phase could be improved, both to A) help the board turn tighter and to B) allow me to go more vertical without back winding. I assume that the boom hand will be stretched no matter.

    I have three suggestions:
    1) Swing the rig to the outside and back to open the clew further and move the coe back.
    2) Move the boom hand back towards the lines for a few extra degrees of clew opening.
    3) Pull the mast hand into the body to achieve the same.
    4) Some combination of the above.
    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 31st May 2015 at 08:15 AM.
    The infamous wavewriter

  2. #2
    Member alexasu's Avatar
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    What helped me a lot was to go out on a big board in light winds and rig-steer the board to the "switch stance clew first" position on a beam reach and then try to sail straight for a bit before turning back. That gives you some idea of where the rig needs to be not to work against you and even aid you when doing carving turns. At least for the upright style mostly seen on onshore conditions.
    /alex

    lommavindsurfing.se

  3. #3
    Senior Member Witchcraft's Avatar
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    Yes, also having the right size sail with power but not too much and not too much loose leach helps. When sailing clew first, a loose leach works against you and increases power which also is pointing against where you want to go. Like Alex said, sailing clew first is a good way to practice.
    Bouke
    Witchcraft Windsurfing Fuerteventura

  4. #4
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    Not meaning to sound smart but I've gone clew first hundreds of times (should have written thousands, and on all sorts of gear and conditions over a period of about ten years) and believe I'm quite good. So I'm looking for the golden nuggets here. It's my impression that the mast hand makes a big difference. But I'm not quite sure how. There are different ways of opening the clew (= sheeting in on the new tack). And then you have the c.o.e issue. Moving the centre of effort in the sail back is standard procedure if you want to head up from a normal reach. Is there any reason why moving the coe back wouldn't help you turn tighter also when going clew first? Then finally you (may) want to achieve both things at the same time without wasting too much energy or dislocating the joints of your body. So lets have the top tips please!
    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 25th May 2015 at 02:10 PM.
    The infamous wavewriter

  5. #5
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    Let me add that I'm thinking of very well powered sailing in conditions with crappy angles and little push from the waves. (The rationale for being very well powered is the lack of decent waves which would make an underpowered session exceedingly boring.) And where you need to turn perhaps more than 180 degrees to present the board to the "wave" in the top turn. It's kind of a specialist disiplin for people who find it tiring to drive six hours each way to score good conditions but still want to make some use of the nice wave gear in conditions that most people regard as bump and jump only. Better rig handling skills will however clearly pay off also in better conditions.

    Let me also add that just spinning a board around into the wind wouldn't have been a problem without the rig. But the more power you have the harder it becomes to turn really tight. And the more important it therefore becomes to understand how the the rig may help or hinder the turning. I have had some success lately with the board seemingly turning on a dime, but I'm not certain exactly how or why. (Late edit: A "controlled spin out" of the twin fins?) I am however pretty certain that the potential gains from better rig handling outweighs any gains from buying new gear! So if someone can help people like me saving years of trial and error in crappy onshore riding it would be great.
    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 31st May 2015 at 08:23 AM.
    The infamous wavewriter

  6. #6
    I sail a lot in onshore winds but I don't really understand what is being asked here.

    When going down the line in onshore conditions you try to keep as much board speed as possible to help keep apparent wind flowing across the sail, and you must use the push of the wave as best possible to achieve that, so your line along the wave is quite critical.
    There then comes a point after any bottom turn, where the apparent wind 'catches up with you' and you need to go clew first. If not well powered, this will happen sooner rather than later.
    You can of course sail along the wave clew first, sailing in a straight line to the spot where you pick a top turn (we see Koster do this at Pozo all the time).
    It's good to practice clew-first sailing, to get the feel for it in terms of how to control the rig. What was the back hand becomes the front hand, presenting the clew to the wind – and so the hand nearer the mast then controls the sheeting angle

    I don't understand what you mean by talking about moving the COE. The sail when clew first must still have the COE over the CoLR – or else you will be turning. When clew first this means cranking the rig to what was the windward rail but is now the leeward one, and it's arguable you are using the sail like a spinnaker (more than a foil with wind flowing across it). It's easier to hold the rig with boom end towards the wind if you have good outhaul on the sail as this helps stabilise the leech (when it has effectively become the luff).
    Sailing along in this way, you then have some power to drive the board (if less efficient power than the normal mast-first setting) and the board can then be surfed on the wave with the feet. Where you steer – or where you turn – then determines what must happen with the sail.
    You still hold the rig out in front of you, but with the clew end front arm more straight than the sheeting (mast) hand. Where you put you hands on the boom will determine the relative load on each arm, and that, in turn, still affects the loads on the board via each foot.
    If it feels odd, that's simply because you are not used to sailing clew first.

    And, haha, re-reading this, it's something best practiced, rather than written about.
    Last edited by basher; 25th May 2015 at 12:40 PM.
    Now back in the UK.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by basher View Post
    I sail a lot in onshore winds but I don't really understand what is being asked here.
    Thank you Basher! Everything you write makes sense, as do the replies from Alex and Bouke. And when neither answers my question it's not only because most of the active members here are much better writers than readers. But also because most people don't regard semi breaking onshore windswell as rideable. And for a reason. It's bloody difficult.

    So once again the conditions I'm talking about are:
    - very onshore
    - irregular windswell/chop/waves were you really have to look high and low for any opportunity for a single frontside hit, and will have very little time and space to complete the "ride"
    - mostly be very well or even over powered

    What I'm trying to achieve is to crank the board around 180 degrees or more with a radious of maybe less than three meters. There will be no straight lining a long the wave because the "wave" doesn't have any length to speak of. So more than sailing a long clew first it's a question of turning the board very hard (imagine a tight 360 being aborted at 180 degrees for a top turn back around). I've been working on this for ten years since I bought my 05' Evo. I don't need to learn how to sail clew first. But like most others I'll profit fom learning to how to handle a powered rig in way that will allow for the tightest possible turn. And since turning is the point in question, moving the coe aft seems highly relevant.

    Of course being able to turn super tight is often important also in slightly better but still very onshore waves like in Pozo. As is the ability to point very high in clew first mode for a top turn.
    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 25th May 2015 at 02:59 PM.
    The infamous wavewriter

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