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  1. #8
    I've never said you're a crap sailor.
    I have however said several times that you focus on the wrong thing.
    'Pointing the clew at the wind' is another example of that.

    When pro wave sailors tells they 'surf the boom' when wave riding that's another example of misdirection.
    What they are actually doing is surfing the board, using the rig to help load the feet better.
    Main boards: Flare 101, NuEvo 86, UltraKode 80, Reactor 82, NuEvo 73. Powered by Severne Blades and S1s.

  2. #9
    I think its all about the thumb on your (old) back hand. I saw Victor take his off the boom in picture 4. This releases upward thumb pressure which allows the clew to drop slightly, driving the nose of the board back down the wave. Try that next time.

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    "Surf it, Smell it, Enjoy it..."

  3. #10
    Ah yes. The rule of thumb. That's in the RYA syllabus, I think.
    Main boards: Flare 101, NuEvo 86, UltraKode 80, Reactor 82, NuEvo 73. Powered by Severne Blades and S1s.

  4. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by boards_Tomas View Post
    I believe the clue is to allow the clew to point almost straight at the wind before moving the back hand. This will mostly happen automatically as you turn up the wave. But if you don't turn far enough or are still too sheeted for some reason, I don't see why extending the mast arm or pulling on the boom arm would not help.
    Still only chop riding up here, but had a great first run with perhaps ten tacks and twenty top turns before landing dry. Staying dry is not a goal but when I pull off the moves I want to without falling in it feels great. Later I fell a lot more.

    Conditions were very well powered with 87/5.5 and so onshore that most people wouldn't be trying to going frontside, whereas someone like me who's done this over and over can sort of ride or turn frontside on both tacks by taking avantage of only very small changes in wave direction. And by bending the mast hand in the bottom turn. We are talking twenty degrees maximum and nothing really to smack. Anticipating when or where these things are going to break is nigh on impossible. But I can often more or less plane through the top turn.

    This session confirmed to me that If you extend the mast arm before the top turn (or simply keep it extended through the bottom turn) the sail will depower more before the top turn. Rather than having to hang on for dear life, the momentary loss of power frees up your body to better stear the board and lets you move the back hand towards the lines. If needed. Which is what I had hoped for!
    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 25th October 2015 at 11:53 PM.
    The infamous wavewriter

  5. #12
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    Scored very clean semi fast over head side on conditions today and did four top turns on the first wave. Had lots of nice multi turn rides. No mush. Still no real aerials but several fast and fluid top turns and few exits with good push from the critical section.

    With higher speeds and better angles there is if course less need to bend the front arm to achieve an efficient sheeting angle and therefore also less need to depower by extending before the top as explained. I still think it's worth to consider that by only using one arm to adjust the sheeting angle you have a maximum range of about 45 degrees and can double this by using both arms. I'm pretty flexible at the waist myself but I can't see why not every body would profit from two helping hands rather than just one. By extending the mast arm just before the top turn I found it much easier to move the back hand towards the lines - which is the topic of this thread.

    Totally off topic, but today I actually sailed the same spot as last winter on the newave twin when I decided I needed something big and fast to punch out, get up wind and catch the waves. The kode wave 87 is a great choice. I see many people on much more radical designs that don't get much action in such conditions. One of the problems for me in this particular spot is it's my wrong jumping tack so I tend to head up too much to get going early and also loose speed on landings by forgetting to pull in the tail enough. Or by pulling too much and landing on my nose. Ouch! I will probably take the newwave to Pozo as a stronger wind alternative since I'm much more confident on that jumping tack.
    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 26th October 2015 at 11:54 PM.
    The infamous wavewriter

  6. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by boards_Tomas View Post
    PS: I really don't get it why Basher keeps thinking I am such a crap sailor just because I keep saying that I am!
    A friend who's also a very good waverider just told me I should stop talking myself down. You sail damn well, he said. From now on I'll be a shameless bragger! If I'm not quite as good as Koster it's only because I wasted my youth and am now as old as his grand father.
    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 25th October 2015 at 11:33 PM.
    The infamous wavewriter

  7. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by boards_Tomas View Post
    A friend who's also a very good waverider just told me I should stop talking myself down. You sail damn well, he said. From now on I'll be a shameless bragger! If I'm not quite as good as Koster it's only because I wasted my youth and am now as old as his grand father.

    Like.

    (But forget concentrating on the bent front arm. #red herring. #not relevant #surftheboard)
    Main boards: Flare 101, NuEvo 86, UltraKode 80, Reactor 82, NuEvo 73. Powered by Severne Blades and S1s.

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