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  1. #29
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    What Ola wrote above conforms with what Basher's been going on about. That the more speed you can generate and the better you surf the wave, the less you have to worry about hand placement. On starboard tack I put the board on it's rail and generate speed while looking for and expecting to hit the lip. If there is any. (It's good that we don't get any real waves up here as I'm actually scared of them. But please don't tell anyone. ). If lucky I get some push and can turn back down the wave fast enough not to need to move my back hand a lot. If very overpowered I'll probably just hang on. But normally I now move my boom hand towards the lines without thinking.

    On port tack it's a completely different game. I'm hesitant on the redirect/bottom turn and I don't generate enough drive to get to the lip without almost stalling. And once there I really struggle to get my back hand moving, head turning and weight on the heels etc. On one of my port tack top turns the other day, the boom was actually ripped out of my boom hand for a split second. (It was only 18 ms.) But since I was already on on my heels I kept turning sufficiently fast to catch up with the boom and regrip for something resembling a complete top turn. Inspiring.

    It's off topic. But I really need a mantra to transfer my skills from starboard to port tack. It's interesting that a thing like that can be so hard to do even if you've tried hundreds of times, have a good theoretical understanding of what needs to be done, and can even actually do it quite well on the other rack.
    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 10th August 2016 at 10:16 PM.
    The infamous wavewriter

  2. #30
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    Jul 2014
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    Berkeley Ca.
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    Transfering the wave riding skills to the opposite tack is a rare animal even for pro, expert, and advanced wavesailors.
    Kinda like riding equally well goof and regular, a rare breed can do it, one in 10,000 probably in surfing.
    The Hawaiins have a head start, as trade and kona winds bring opposite tack wave riding at the same spots. VERY few wavesailors can make Diamond Head and Backyards work for them on successive days, and I"m including borderline pro material also.

  3. #31
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    That's interesting Lee, and corresponds with my own feeling and thinking. Given that port is what's mostly on offer for me, I'll have to keep on struggling. When bottom turning left I tend to focus on the rig. But maybe getting more onto the balls of my front foot is a better idea. Plus looking further around the turn while holding a more positive expectation. Practicing more and tighter gybes on port may also help. I've mainly been tacking the last couple of years, both for practise and to gain more upwind ground to be used on waveriding. But it means doing transitions about every minute and wears me completely out. (When it's very windy or confused I often just luff up, sink in, turn the rig and waterstart as this gives me time to catch my breath. I really hope nobody's noticed.) It's by the way thursday morning and I'm still knackered from my sailing last monday. It was only four hours in 18 ms and I'm still only 57, ha ha.
    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 11th August 2016 at 05:55 AM.
    The infamous wavewriter

  4. #32
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    Jul 2014
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    Berkeley Ca.
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    Us humans are asymetrical, I suspect.
    I surfed goofy foot for over 25 years, getting as high as 4A in California, like a local pro level in competition surfing. No prize money, only gifts and trophies.
    Since I started windsurfing in waves, I could only ride waves regular foot, and after over 15 days sailing Diamond Head, over 40 up the road at Kahala, I can barely sail waves riding on starboard tack.
    But first day DTL at Swift St. Santa Cruz, I could bottom turn and come hard off the lip, my second year of wavesailing, riding port, or regular foot.
    And surfing, I can barely stand up and angle off regular foot.
    Humans are strange.

  5. #33
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    May 2008
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    72
    This 20-turns wave really shows the hand and body movements: http://windsurfing.tv/video/how-long...wave-20-turns/
    Windjunkie

  6. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by jacobfischer View Post
    This 20-turns wave really shows the hand and body movements: http://windsurfing.tv/video/how-long...wave-20-turns/
    Fantastic wave. Not easy to get his perspective, but I notice that the "bottom turns" are generally short and quick. I guess he's mostly staying high on a wave and only need to do some short cut backs or whatsitscalled to stay on the steep part. It's a very different game to the onshore thing many struggle with.
    The infamous wavewriter

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