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  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    136

    Gybing with a different boom

    I bought a new boom a while ago. I have had a few sessions with it. It is narrower, stiffer and lighter than my old one. It weighs 1.9Kg rather than 2.8Kg. It improved sailing handling and manoeuvrability. My jumping and riding improved. However I was thinking after my last session how bad my gybes were. Could it possibly be to do with my lovely new(ish) boom? I got my kit out it the back garden today and tried flipping the rig around. I used to be quite good at this with my old boom, but initially I was terrible. After 20 minutes practice, everything became slicker and all my faulty instinctive rig flipping re-actions were overcome.
    The axis of rotation of the rig has changed with the new boom, being closer to the mast. Also the swing momentum is much less, so the flip needs to be faster to avoid the rig "flagging" before it has got to new front hand. I will practice again to improve the muscle memory, and I'm sure my gybes will be improved next time I go sailing.
    I guess I'm posting this because I was surprised how much effect the boom weight had, and wonder whether anyone else has had a similar experience.
    Also, if you've just bought a new boom, you could try rigging up in your garden to feel the new rig balance.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Sep 2008
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    Bournemouth
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    2,498
    My expernce is the more u shaped section of new style boom shapes near the mast is better for gybeing. The rig flicks better than the more v shaped old school types. I've never really noticed weight having an affect. Has the booms curve changed?

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    136
    The new lighter boom has more "parallel" arms. The section of the tubes is circular.

    Quote Originally Posted by TallJames View Post
    My expernce is the more u shaped section of new style boom shapes near the mast is better for gybeing. The rig flicks better than the more v shaped old school types. I've never really noticed weight having an affect. Has the booms curve changed?

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    3,876
    TJ is right, I noticed a difference when I changed from the "New School" shape to a more standard shape of boom and I think the reason is that the new school shape helps to keep the mast/rig further forward and away from you in the gybe initiation. With the more normal shape of boom I purposely move my front hand closer to the harness lines and make sure my front arm is straight. A narrow boom also brings you closer to the rig so you really need longer lines to compensate.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    2,488
    I never got comfortable with the more square shape of the modern North wavebooms but have gotten used to the sligthly less radical modern shapes from other brands. Worst experience ever was an NP x6 (see picture). Not because of the shape but because of the very slippery silvery plastic front end. A good boom must allow for sliding the mast hand easily right up to the mast and hold it until it's time to spin it around. I always move my arms in opposite directions (think push/pull) when changing sheeting angles or spinning the rig in a gybe, and don't rely on momentum to make the boom swing around. The boom always presents itself nicely on the new tack as long as I keep turning by pushing on the inside hip. I guess that if you more like just let the sail go and have a lazy approach to carving, then a heavier boom may be helpful due to the increased momentum.
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    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 1st November 2015 at 09:22 PM.
    The infamous wavewriter

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    136
    I've found that the heavier boom makes the spin axis move further towards the clew. This means you draw the rig further over the board before flipping. Therefore the clew tip of the boom is angled upwards. So when the flip starts, the clew falls in a more downward motion, helping to immediately gain speed, and hence plenty of momentum. You get used to this if you use the same boom all the time, it not that it's lazy. I've found that with the lighter boom can spin nicely whilst being more centred over the board, but you do need to be more proactive with both hands to get the same spin speed.

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