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  1. #1
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    Rig forwards - Why so hard?

    If there's one style difference that really sets the better sailors apart it's the ability to get the rig forwards in gybes and bottom turns. Why don't more people catch up. Fear of catapulting? Or do people simply not see the point in sticking the rig forwards and into the turns? From looking at pictures that many sailors chose for profiles one could wonder which is the case. But I'm simply asking here.
    The infamous wavewriter

  2. #2
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    I agree getting the rig forward is important but I think there are a couple of reasons why some never seem to catch on. Firstly I don't think a lot of gybe tutorials emphasise that aspect enough or indeed show how to achieve it without being pulled over the front. Second, it can feel pretty risky if not done correctly ( e.g. sheeting in hard with the back hand) so the natural instinct for survival is to pull back on the rig.

    I think as far as the gybe is concerned the best tip to help someone get the rig forward is to get them to move the front hand back on the boom so that it is gripping the front harness line Velcro. Obviously it needs to be combined with all the other aspects of gybe initiation.

  3. #3
    Senior Member bman18's Avatar
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    I suppose that with "rig forward" you mean laying the rig down?
    Click image for larger version. 

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    As opposed to this:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    If so, I think that you first need a decent sized wave, both to get speed and time. Not always easy to find in typical Euro conditions. That same wave also needs to be quite glassy as you won't commit 100% on the rail if you just bounce around.
    Last edited by bman18; 6th December 2015 at 10:10 AM.
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  4. #4
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    In my book those are both forwards.
    The infamous wavewriter

  5. #5
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    As stated in the op the point is to keep the nose down. Nose down means flat board and more speed. I don't sail much in bigger waves. But I note from amateur photos and videos how people tend to pull on the brakes when it gets big and let the waves hit them rather than the other way. I probably would too, if I deared go out. I also guess it's hard to get ones head around the fact that when going down a wave the board should not only be kept horizontal but aligned with the slope of the wave. I know I'm stating the obvious here. But we're mostly not born surfers here are we?
    The infamous wavewriter

  6. #6
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    Seems to me, rig forwards is only vital when attempting planing jibes.
    When doing snap jibes, or just between swell jibes, it's not important at all, and can draw out the turns too far to stay within a short radius turn.
    Planing jibes is just one form of jibes.

  7. #7
    All my powered gybes have the rig well forward for the first part of the carve or bottom turn - whether on a wave or on flat water.
    The rig is set forwards to get the turning power of the rig more towards the nose, to engage more rail, and to get sailor weight off the tail of the board so as to maintain good planing speed through the turn.

    For sure you don't need to do this because you could just keep the rig more upright and carve on what board speed you have - but you will then slow down and may well drop off the plane.

    So getting the rig more forwards is very much part of a commited bottom turn or gybe. You need to be well powered and laying the rig forwards is also done sheeted in - so the rig load is very much on the back hand which in turn loads the back (carving) foot better.
    If you are on a wave then you hold this position before redirecting the board at the top of the wave. But if gybing you hold this position until the apparent wind tells you it's time for the rig flip (or step then rig flip if a step gybe is needed).
    Now back in the UK.

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