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  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    Jul 2004
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    Push on boom hand to flip the rig!

    For lack of wind I've been doing a bit of slowstyle on a 68 wide floater with a 6.2. When attempting upwind 360s I struggled to keep the mast upright during the last stage of the turn where the sail needs to swing around and back into position for a normal reach after having pointed clew first into the wind. The solution was to push on the boom hand before releasing the sail to make the it spin faster. Worked every time.

    It also reminded me of something a friend with too little TOW recently told me. He said that when gybing he will just release the sail with the back hand and wait for it to present itself nicely on the new tack. Which it does. Sometimes.

    But often not. With this technique people will often spin around too far into the wind before they can catch the sail. Or start leaning out of the turn to try and catch a faraway boom.

    So how many of you do consciously and actively push on the boom arm to spin the rig faster in transitions? Or why not?
    The infamous wavewriter

  2. #2
    Which hand are you calling the 'boom hand' ? (Both my hands are on the boom, with the back hand dong there sheeting in, and the front hand often called the mast hand.)

    I think I do push the boom with my back hand in some gybe situations but every gybe is different.

    This is how I look at it: In any turn, I'm normally concentrating on following the optimal path with the rise and fall of the waves in the hope of continually heading downhill, and the timing and speed of the rig flip is then determined by that path.

    The point of the rig flip is felt when the rig goes light, but that is at different moments in each turn depending on apparent wind issues. Sometimes if you go for a fast rig flip then you can go from full drive on one tack to grabbing the new side of the boom with full power to drive you on, for the next leg.

    On any day, what I do on the outside gybe is usually different from the inside gybe due to the different water conditions found.
    For the outside gybe I often gybe on the steep face of an oncoming wave and try to stay with the wave after a fast rig flip. On the inside gybe, in shallower water, I try and gybe into a flat valley of the wave, and if I can stay with the wave I should do a fully planing gybe. If I can't stay with that wave then the rig flip often coincides with the wave passing under the board so that I can then grab the rig on the new side to pump downhill into the next valley after only a small stall in speed.
    Main boards: Flare 101, NuEvo 86, UltraKode 80, Reactor 82, NuEvo 73. Powered by Severne Blades and S1s.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    Yes, boom hand = back hand. I was mainly thinking flat water planing gybes.
    The infamous wavewriter

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    Nov 2009
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    If the gybe is quite a tight arc..for example to cut underneath someone else at a mark and come out up wind of them....and if it is a step gybe.....you can exit clew first and having stepped already, be quite far forward on the board. The mast therefore remains more upright and with a relatively long clew there is less force to rotate the sail completely. Throwing it away with the back hand helps to make sure it fully rotates......possibly also more applicable to a deep bellied slalom sail. If you come out of the gybe on a broad reach and with the mast racked slightly towards the tail of the board, there is no need to throw it.

  5. #5
    Concentrating on the rig flip, you can either 'let go' with your back hand or, yes, you could physically 'push' the boom away with your hand.
    But you can also aggressively flip the rig with your front hand – either placed on the boom end or perhaps on the mast.

    It's important to remember that as the rig flips the mast has to travel/slice across the board, and that in a fast gybe the rig is not just rotating with the mast in a vertical position.


    I also find this difficult to put in descriptive words because that's not really how you/we learn these things.
    And every gybe is slightly different.
    Main boards: Flare 101, NuEvo 86, UltraKode 80, Reactor 82, NuEvo 73. Powered by Severne Blades and S1s.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    I do actually also pull with the mast hand while pushing or throwing with the boom arm. The timing is just after it gets light. I try and sort of load up the sail with a bit of energy before throwing. With small sails I belive I can spend just a second before catching the boom on the other side. That's partly why I hardly ever fall of the plane. But I don't gybe on flat water unless well powered. Fast tacking keeps me upwind.

    I agree that when you exit on a broad course, like when gybing onto a wave in cross on, it can be preferable to focus firstly on surfing the wave and just give the sail a bit of time to come around.
    The infamous wavewriter

  7. #7
    Senior Member
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    Dec 2007
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    To speed up the rotation I don't think I throw the boom away with the back hand but do pull the mast across the board with the front hand. In lighter winds throwing it away might backwind the sail. When keeping the sail sheeted in at the start of the gybe as soon as I let it go it and pull with the front hand that's enough to rotate it.

    https://youtu.be/URnw2XBYo6I

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