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  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
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    3

    Hi all, noob fatty needs advice!

    Hi all,

    First off I'm a 37 year old bloke, live next to the sea in Seaford, East Sussex and I weigh roughly about 100kg.

    I've lived here for 5 years, and although I've not seen any windsurfing going on along this stretch, I do see the kitesurfers quite often.

    My mate just offered me a windsurfing board which got me thinking about the sport and how I'd love to get into it (also might help me to lose weight!) I have windsurfed once when I was about 15 which I remember being great fun!

    I've been lurking around this forum for a couple of days, reading up on stuff, and I've come to realise that it might not be as simple as I first thought. Being the weight that I am I might need a bigger board and whatever else.

    I do plan on finding some lessons, such as the RYA course, but would like to know what equipment specs I should be looking out for.

    I have already started bidding on some kit on eBay but now I've been reading here, fear that I'd be too heavy for it (or at least as a complete novice).

    So any advice on equipment for my size and courses in this area that you know about? Or if there's a group of you near here that's willing to put up with a noob lol

    Cheers guys
    Stu

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    692
    Hi Stu,


    Welcome to the forum. Don’t worry about your weight, kit comes in all shapes and sizes and its never been easier to learn and progress.


    When learning the basics you need a really big and wide board, as a result they are a bit unruly to cart around and as you progress quite quickly beyond them most people will advise you to get lessons and hire learner kit to cover the first 5 or 6 sessions at a minimum. From there you will get a feel for how you are progressing and what sort of board and rig you think you need. If you start on a 200l board the next step and the one to buy would be a 150-170l board (something like a starboard go). If you can hire one of these then that would help you get an idea. Where many people fall down is they are to eager to progress and after a couple of lessons on a big wide board they buy something smaller in volume but much narrower and less suitable and as a result progress just drops of dramatically and people give up.

    The key is to nail the basics with an instructor and hiring learner kit and then make a move on to something that will help you not hinder you. You can have loads of fun on a big intermediate board and you would likely keep it long term as a light wind board anyway.

    Post up any questions on here. Good luck.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator na-omi's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Back end of a boat
    Posts
    4,390
    As you've probably already read elsewhere, beginner stuff is much easier these days, and will help you progress pretty quickly, so I'd hold off buying anything to begin with and get yourself out on some very good gear whilst getting proper lessons for a flying start, and get your instructors to advise you on what kind of stuff will suit you.

    You move through the early stuff pretty quickly, so can either use the centre's stuff and buy something a bit later on, or get the best set up second hand, then sell it on once you've moved on a bit. Don't buy anything in a rush without getting specific advice on it... you could end up with useless stuff and a hard road to learning.

    Sailing on the sea is something to be tackled in the right conditions once you've got some skills under your belt, so starting on Hove Lagoon would be a very good initial re-introduction. The centre there have all the kit and courses you'll need to start with, a club you can join longer term that also hires out equipment as you progress, and they teach people on the sea the other side of the sea wall once they're ready:

    https://www.lagoon.co.uk/windsurfing

  4. #4
    Senior Member overthehill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Just the wrong side of the Downs, Hants
    Posts
    520
    A freind of mine, similar weight to yourself learned the basics at the lagoon as suggested by Naomi. Whilst wind is not terribly clear there, it's toally flat and not exactly deep, so ideal for the intial stages. Seemed to have a good vibe there as well and as said, you progress to open water once ready.
    My Flickr Windsurf collection: http://www.flickr.com/photos/bsideth...7622592103903/
    Hayling Windsurf & Kitesurf Photographers: http://www.flickr.com/groups/1993863@N23/

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    3
    Thanks all,
    I didn't know Hove Lagoon did windsurfing. So thanks for the heads up. I reckon that'll be where I go to get the RYA qualification.

    I've just heard back from the Newhaven & Seaford Sailing Club who've emailed to say that they might be able to sort out getting me on the water for the first time with one of their experienced windsurfers. So I'll go and have a chat with them at the weekend

    Getting excited!

  6. #6
    Super Moderator na-omi's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Back end of a boat
    Posts
    4,390
    Sounds like the perfect combo... course at the Lagoon, then out on the doorstep with the local club

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    191
    As others have said, equipment is available for all abilities and weights and as such your progression in the first few months will be rapid, both in terms of ability but also the board and sail you'll use. This progression means it's more cost effective to hire stuff and not buy anything until you're settled, and this also means you can move up when you're ready, rather than hanging around on beginners' kit for too long whilst you wait to sell and buy.

    One related word of warning: you will meet plenty of people who forget what it's like to be a beginner and recommend intermediate/advanced kit at a totally unsuitable stage. I'm a beginner/intermediate and I get this all the time - getting told my sail's too small for the wind or my board's too big. If you learn through an individual at the club rather than a proper beginner's course, then make sure the board you're using is nice and wide and that the sail is small and light; most people with this sort of equipment are up and sailing properly within minutes, if not seconds, and windsurfing shouldn't be the struggle it used to be in the early days of the sport.

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