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Thread: Every time:)

  1. #1
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    Every time:)

    Since the wave and technique sections appear dead I'll be posting my impressions and ideas here. (Edit: Thread's been moved to the technique section it turns out.) It'll service the double purpose of sharing my enthusiasm (aka bragging) and trying to inspire others to improve in the crappy onshore conditions most of us have to live with. All the new fancy wave gear people keep hauling to crappy spots seems to indicate that being able to turn on a wave is something that many would like to do.

    Yesterday started awfully with a nasty combination of gusts and chop. Only after I'd become half nackered did a small wave start rising. It's only a one hit possibility, which probably makes it seem little to write about. In my opinion the fact that almost everyone misses it due to technique issues makes it worth commenting on. Helping others to get that frontside S-wiggle right would also make it more interesting for me to watch others and get a little rest in the shallow.

    I think that anyone who can do a good gybe on a wave can do an equally good bottom turn, although being stuck in the back strap takes some getting used to. Hand placement and sheeting and getting weight on front foot is therefore perhaps not what many need to focus on when going front side.

    As I've understood, it's the "clew first" part that screws up the ride. And I've become pretty convinced that this is due to a common misunderstanding. The thing is that even freestylers that regularly sail clew first switch stance at planing speeds can fail when trying to hit a very onshore wave front side. The reason is that that you need to point much higher. So what works for straight lining on a broad course isn't necessarily what works in waves. It will only take you down wind alongside the wave until it disappears (typical in my conditions) or you eventually start losing speed and therefore overpowers or get back winded. Been there?

    Interestingly the cure is really simple. Stop reaching that rig forwards clew first while hoping for a miracle. Get it out of the way. Turning tightly into the wind (and that's where you'll find your lip if there is one in onshore conditions) requires that the pull in the sail is brought rearwards and that your sail stays well sheeted relative to the apparent wind as you turn upwind and lose speed. And for this I've found that simply swinging the rig out and back once through downwind really does the trick. It sheets the sail for the new tack (avoids back winding) and moves the centre of effort back for easy upwind carving. It simultaneously works as an opposing force to get your body forwards and into the turn.

    I by the way no longer think much about pulling in or extending either arm, although the old back arm (what I call boom arm since it's further away from the mast) that you pull in on entering the bottom turn must of course be extended once through down wind. And I may also pull the other hand into the body a bit if I have to search further downwind for a steeper section.

    I now hit the wave (if it's still there...) frontside almost every time on SB tack. A freestyler on the beach (not Pozo mind you) yesterday said I look like pro. Well that's just because the others look so crap I replied. (I actually said thank you very much and went on to try and visualise the rig handling. I guess you can imagine. ).you
    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 28th September 2016 at 08:24 PM.
    The infamous wavewriter

  2. #2
    Sorry but I got about halfway through the first two paragraphs and still don't know what this is about.


    What is the point of posting a technique thread in the HWIFY section – and under a title that no-one understands?

    Just saying.


    If the technique section is dead, then post a new thread there – with an interesting or informing title that draws people in. That's how you generate interest.


    Anyway. Carry on.
    Main boards: Flare 101, NuEvo 86, UltraKode 80, Reactor 82, NuEvo 73. Powered by Severne Blades and S1s.

  3. #3
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    Wow, this is the first time in a long while that I've received one of your constructive comments (ironic now but not bitter).

    So you bothered to respond and tell us you didn't understand without first bothering to read through? Like most people you probably have a pretty firm idea about from whom you may be able to learn something new. And I'm obviously not one of those. But you've known that from the start, haven't you?

    The great thing about me posting about how it was for me in the how was it for you section is that you can be absolutely certain that it's only my own thoughts and impressions. So unless you're interested you can direct your attention elsewhere. Right? And reading is after all a lot harder than writing.
    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 7th September 2016 at 08:12 PM.
    The infamous wavewriter

  4. #4
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    Hi Thomas, what do you mean

    "Interestingly the cure is really simple. Stop reaching that rig forwards clew first while hoping for a miracle. Get it out of the way.....And for this I've found that simply swinging the rig out and back once through downwind really does the trick. It sheets the sail for the new tack (avoids back winding) and moves the centre of effort back for easy upwind carving. It simultaneously works as an opposing force to get your body forwards and into the turn."


    I'm lousy in cross on conditions. Do you mean lean the sail away from the wave and your body towards the wave? Or am I as clueless as I feel?

  5. #5
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    Yes, that's what I mean. The clue is understanding that what works when heading off the wind down the wave in the bottom turn, no longer works when heading (or trying to head) back upwind and up the wave for a frontside top turn. And you have very little time. So just swing the rig out and back on straightish arms once you're through down wind or thereabouts. (Think head and hips into the turn, but arms and rig out.) It can of course be useful at times to concentrate a bit more on sheeting angles and such but for that we'll mostly just have to go by feel. I believe that it was partly the very little time spent by pros from bottom turn entry to top turn exit that spurred the idea that there must be a simpler way to think about handling the rig. If I can make it work also on port tack I should be able to get some footage from Pozo this winter. It probably won't impress anyone except from within its relevant context: A guy closer to sixty years old who's been making rapid progress in the waves by thinking up and applying a simple mantra for rig handling. Note that I'm talking about the "vertical" part of the ride, just before you get back onto your heels for the top turn. And I'm only talking about small onshore waves. That's all I know anything about.
    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 7th September 2016 at 10:38 PM.
    The infamous wavewriter

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by boards_Tomas View Post
    Wow, this is the first time in a long while that I've received one of your constructive comments (ironic now but not bitter).

    So you bothered to respond and tell us you didn't understand without first bothering to read through? Like most people you probably have a pretty firm idea about from whom you may be able to learn something new. And I'm obviously not one of those. But you've known that from the start, haven't you?

    The great thing about me posting about how it was for me in the how was it for you section is that you can be absolutely certain that it's only my own thoughts and impressions. So unless you're interested you can direct your attention elsewhere. Right? And reading is after all a lot harder than writing.

    boards_Thomas, hi.
    I'm sorry but I am blunt – and maybe a bit grumpy at the moment.
    But I did try and read what you wrote and got as far as realising it was something to do with onshore riding, and then I lost the will to live. I guess we all skim read forum threads nowadays. As the writer, you need a few obvious clues and signposts.
    I'm guessing it's either a wavesailing or it's a technique thread.

    We do need more threads started on here, so thanks. I don't really care if people put threads in the 'wrong' section but, if you want a response – or if people later do a search to find the topic – then you need to be in the appropriate section, and you certainly need an explanatory title to the thread. This is me, being constructive.


    But maybe I'm also a bit thick. So if someone else can post a summary of the question or issue here, then more people like me can understand what is being discussed and can then join in.

    I actually love threads like these, and would happily give a detailed and opinionated answer – if I knew what was being asked or discussed.


    PS. All wave riding questions are really about understanding apparent wind. I can talk about that for hours. But there's obviously no point in writing detailed stuff here, because this thread will soon be lost, due to the title.
    Perhaps our moderators could move this and add an appropriate title?
    Last edited by basher; 8th September 2016 at 01:16 AM.
    Main boards: Flare 101, NuEvo 86, UltraKode 80, Reactor 82, NuEvo 73. Powered by Severne Blades and S1s.

  7. #7
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    I found your description confusing but think I get it now. I am trying frontside in onshoreish winds so will try what you say. Some pics of Pros show them doing what you say.

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