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Thread: Every time:)

  1. #15
    Can anyone see a wave in that picture?
    Isn't that a flat water gybe, just before the rig flip?

    I may be wrong.
    Main boards: Flare 101, NuEvo 86, UltraKode 80, Reactor 82, NuEvo 73. Powered by Severne Blades and S1s.

  2. #16
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    Isn't the point, and one that Mr Hart is so admirably demonstrating here, that we need to move our bodies far more than we often think we are doing. Whether on a wave, or a ripple, most of us can learn from an image like that.

  3. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by basher View Post
    Can anyone see a wave in that picture?
    Isn't that a flat water gybe, just before the rig flip?

    I may be wrong.
    You're right, unless he's planning on keeping both feet in the straps.

  4. #18
    Senior Member max111's Avatar
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    Peter Hart does tell you to practise the actions on flat water in his tuition video serious about waves i think it is

  5. #19
    Whilst it may be good advice to practice more turns on flat water, that doesn't actually help you on the wave much because, in surf and on a wave face, lots of other stuff starts happening.

    You get the speed from the wave's push and/or from its slope, and so that effectively changes the wind direction in your sail. It's then one thing to carve the board on the wave, and another thing to correctly position your sail for it to go neutral or else to maximise rig drive.
    And this is why we talk about sailors 'generating speed' on the wave.

    How good you are at generating speed, then determines the apparent wind in your sail.


    If, for example you can keep good speed going into your bottom turn you can sheet in hard as you drop into the wave, using the rig to tighten the turn. This is as true in onshore conditions as it is for cross to cross off, but the quality of the wave is also important.
    It's when you lose speed in onshore conditions that you may need to open up the sail to go more clew first. When you lose speed depends on how good you are, what board you are on, and on how good the wave is. The more onshore the wind, the more you may need to go clew first.

    We cut through all this theory, by simply feeling what is going on in each situation. Unfortunately, you can't teach yourself to wave ride well by setting rules for yourself like Thomas is trying to say. Perhaps stand back and look at the bigger picture here, rather than try and concentrate on one rig movement or body stance..

    My advice to to learn to surf the board on the wave so that it turns and keeps speed. You then use the rig in conjunction with the apparent wind – which is what you feel in your sail. Apparent wind is the true wind of the day, combined with the wind 'created' by your forwards motion. The true wind is also deflected or blanketed by bigger waves, so this gets complicated.


    What that picture of Peter Hart does show, is how the body must often work to carve the board at odds with the rig position. So in that shot the feet are carving the board but the body is contorted to keep body weight well forwards, keeping the board flat to maintain planing speed whilst loading the carving rail. The rig is clew first, and that always means presenting the foot of the sail to the wind – as the leading edge – and that is why the mast has to be leant backwards, shown here at extreme odds with body position. You can actually sail along a wave in this position to reach a lip for your top turn.



    But no more tips from me. This technique thread will be lost in this HWIFY section anyway.
    Last edited by basher; 9th September 2016 at 02:30 PM.
    Main boards: Flare 101, NuEvo 86, UltraKode 80, Reactor 82, NuEvo 73. Powered by Severne Blades and S1s.

  6. #20
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    Since most people hate reading: This tip is important for people and conditions were you need to turn far into the wind on the new tack and don't have a lot of speed to help you keep the apparent wind at a friendly angle. Pushing upwind clew first switch stance on flat water is probably a great exercise. Personally I prefer something resembling a wave for practise. I can promise that I'm not spoilt. People who are probably can't relate to this issue.
    The infamous wavewriter

  7. #21
    Senior Member max111's Avatar
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    Just for you Tomas

    http://www.windsurf.co.uk/peter-hart...-2-real-tales/

    along time ago i promosed you some footage of me doing the DTL stuff in onshore winds on a go-pro
    so now the camera is sorted and Rhossy looks like it will be god tomorrow so when i get it sorted i'll post some in here

    cheers Max
    Last edited by max111; 11th September 2016 at 07:31 PM.

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