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Thread: Every time:)

  1. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by waxham View Post
    Your irrelevance is brilliant, but that does not distract from your doorstepping antics. The capers you align to are shockingly limp cabbage even though you can hold a gybe.Granted that, but to look,quiver and fob off to the masses,Thats treason! Matron says.Must try Harder.

    I think you'll find that, since I wrote that, this thread has been relocated to the correct section.
    Main boards: Flare 101, NuEvo 86, UltraKode 80, Reactor 82, NuEvo 73. Powered by Severne Blades and S1s.

  2. #37
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by boards_Tomas View Post
    Another member of the rig out and back (aka clew high) club

    https://www.continentseven.com/wave-...iballa-moreno/
    Jokes aside, can even Basher now perhaps see what I'm talking about? Feel free to describe her rig handling however you like. Words are unimportant as long as people see whats going on. Having studied a large number of onshore frontside turns from different pros I can assure you that everyone does this to some degree when it's really onshore and slow. For me it's made the difference between smacking and getting smacked (or just stalling out front while waiting for the broken wave to catch me up).

    Consider this. When turning through down wind you have to "open the clew right up". Right? Now if everything goes to plan you will meet up again with the wave you surfed down within a second or so. If it's steep you'll need to hold your clew high. And a high clew means a mast that's tilted bacwards. It's possible to open the clew quite a bit while trying to hold the rig forwards "hookipa style". But it's an unstable position that makes it difficult to handle a lot of power and also to really swing your body weight inwards for a tighter turn. And even if you managed you'd risk stuffing the clew into the wave. Why the supposedly better wavesailor(s) on this forum can't agree is above me.
    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 22nd November 2016 at 10:38 PM.
    The infamous wavewriter

  3. #38
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    Sea swell and a good angle is a rare experience for me. It's my first full day in Pozo and since the north easterly has apparently been turned off I couldn't let a south west 5.3 wind pass so I made it out of the sheltered bay on the big Kode wave and up to Salinas. The lines where few and nothing big but some sets came through. I can't say returns were great but I'm not spoiled and just sitting in the line up with pro(s) and trying to figure out if I could claim a wave or maybe just borrow the down wind shoulder (don't fall now...) was interesting. I only had one good top turn but the feeling of getting pushed forwards on a steep wave were you don't really know what's below is exhilarating. I just focus ahead (rather than down under the nose) and do my best to stay onboard.

    Since this thread's been moved to the technique section I'll make few observations. Compared to onshore where it's very much about reacting fast to an opportunity, the side shore thing is more of a waiting game. But when you're finally on a wave things starts happening fast and you have the pressure from knowing that you could get closed out by the wave you're on or its bigger brother. I also find that it's easy to overshoot the wave. And this problem is compounded by the fact that it's not easy (for me) to see where I'm going. Which may partly be a technique issue. In more onshore conditions I (yes) swing the rig out of the turn and back early and nothing blocks my sight. Perhaps laying it back but now to the inside slalom style is the answer on a real breaking swell with a better angle?
    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 2nd December 2016 at 11:29 PM.
    The infamous wavewriter

  4. #39
    Senior Member Silicon Beach's Avatar
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    Yes, we currently have wind from the right here as well, of course, but no waves - at least not in el Medano - possibly some big ones on the West coast, but with onshore wind and a lot of gnarly rocks! Very occasionally this wind co-incides with a proper south swell, and then the south bay becomes a cross-off playground and you can ride a wave for a good few hundred metres, and get maybe six turns. This combination of conditions has only happened three or four times in the ten years that I've lived here (so as they say: "don't hold your breath").

    This is a pic from one of those days. It was taken by a friend of mine, from the road above the beach, and I'm already probably on my fourth or fifth turn, and heading dtl for the town beach (blue Tushingham Rock) ...
    Click image for larger version. 

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    ps check out our wooftastic books: Nobody's Poodle and just published: Somebody's Doodle
    and our musings from El Medano: Life on the Reef

  5. #40
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    Cool, looks really easy. Sets were really infrequent yesterday with the very occasional two meter long line. It's not easy when there are pros spocking onto the the wave you're hoping to catch. And when you're finally on a wave you'll be precariously close to a stony beach with unknown depth. There's a fine line between too little and too much for a wave writer like me.
    The infamous wavewriter

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