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  1. #8
    Senior Member PK1111's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by basher View Post
    I can see that you might want to practice stuff on dry land and on windless days – but I don't do that.

    It's bit like the Home Guard in 'Dad's Army' practising marching but with broom handles and pitch forks on their shoulders because they haven't got rifles. When faced with the enemy, in battle, how will a broom handle help?


    So the only way to understand wave sailing and to get better at it is to do it.
    Great gybing technique must come first and that can be practised on flat water days. Get your foot positioning perfect and learn to use the rig to tighten the turn.
    Clew first sailing can also be practised on flat days, for better rig control.
    But the real practice comes from putting in time on the wave face, where you then learn to keep driving control over your board whilst simply using the rig to optimum effect with the apparent wind you create.

    When wave riding, the clew first position is often just momentary, because the apparent wind direction changes your board slows at the top of a turn. But maybe you can practice better stance by sailing along a wave face trying to hold the clew first position longer.
    I completely disagree and find your derogatory reference to the dads army ridiculous.
    Windsurfers regularly fall into this trap of trying to make it work on the water, when time is precious, conditions usually challenging and desire to try something new highly variable. Unsurprisingly, failure rates are high.

    No instructor follows "this get out there and do it" approach.
    Imagining, Learning, practising, and planning are all best done on dry land.
    Only when you've got the basics nailed, should you concentrate on refining technique on the water.

    Personally, I find practicising manouvers in the gym is essential, and core rotation is high on the list.

    Good post Tomas.

  2. #9
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    Thank you! I have in fact not been drilling neither the broom stick nor the manuals much lately but have been pulling a tiny bit on the ropes on my Terapimaster that hangs from the ceiling.

    More importantly I've been out in slightly better waves. I'm not talking dtl heaven but conditions that allows for the occasional fast bottomturn and frontside hit. And not only does that extra "shoulder swing" give me (you may be different) some twenty degrees extra sheeting angle. It seems that the process of swinging the rig out and back helps a lot in turning the board up towards the lip without stalling. With straight arms it's actually pretty effortless too and comes in handy also in more sideshore conditions if you're late and want to hit a close corner rather than a mass of white water further down.
    The infamous wavewriter

  3. #10
    Senior Member Silicon Beach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boards_Tomas View Post
    Thank you! I have in fact not been drilling neither the broom stick nor the manuals much lately but have been pulling a tiny bit on the ropes on my Terapimaster that hangs from the ceiling ...
    Sounds interesting Tomas (like some kind of medieval torture / bondage machine?). Love to see some pics if you can post them ...
    -----------------------------
    Currently writing the World's first Windsurfing Novel: 'Too Close to the Wind' - watch this space!
    ps check out my musings from El Medano: Life on the Reef
    -----------------------------
    Boards: Quatro Supermini Thrusters: 94 & 85
    Sails: Severne Blades.

  4. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by boards_Tomas View Post
    More importantly I've been out in slightly better waves. I'm not talking dtl heaven but conditions that allows for the occasional fast bottomturn and frontside hit. And not only does that extra "shoulder swing" give me (you may be different) some twenty degrees extra sheeting angle. It seems that the process of swinging the rig out and back helps a lot in turning the board up towards the lip without stalling. With straight arms it's actually pretty effortless too and comes in handy also in more sideshore conditions if you're late and want to hit a close corner rather than a mass of white water further down.
    I think this is more about muscle memory and perhaps flexibility than strength so don't want to focus too much on the drilling. But to check you can just turn both arms out to one side until you sort of reach a natural limit. Then next use a little momentum while moving your head in the opposite direction as you would when heading up a wave. I believe most people, but especially the aging ws population, will find that the shoulder joints can give a good bit more without causing pain. Remember also that on an onhore wave you'll be holding a powered up sail in your hands. Much of the rotation in the shoulders will come rather naturally if you just keep pushing your inside hip and head into the turn (but without trying to pull in on the mast arm, which is an early but very bad advice I've given!).

    Note that I'm not really inventing a new technique here. I'm only trying to highlight an aspect of tight turning that may come quite natural to the young and talented. When I started hitting my first lips this winter by applying the rig out and back method, it felt like I was taking up a very radical posture. But when I later compared my video to the pros in similarly crap conditions I found that they took it much further. And got a lot more vertical.
    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 24th April 2017 at 10:44 AM.
    The infamous wavewriter

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