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  1. #8
    Senior Member
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    Nov 2009
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    3,876
    I understand your problem but I have to add a word of caution in terms of going for a big slalom board...e.g. Isonic 137. These boards are designed for planning at fast speeds powered by big powerful race sails. They are very specialist light wind planning boards and if they are not planning they are a pain. Very little directional stability, very low volume in front the mast track and they sit flat in the water due to minimal rocker so have very little glide through the water. Stopping the nose from pearling becomes a problem in any swell if not planning.

    If you can find an older Isonic especially something like the 2009 Isonic 120 Wood it will be a lot better. ( n.b wood because you need to a void the carbon boards which you are likely to damage too easily). The Isonic boards were far less dedicated back then and the 120 more user friendly than most others in the range...still not ideal though. At your weight you do not need to be too worried a bout volume so a 120 l board would be fine. What is more important is the width. A wider board will give you much more stability for uphauling and sailing off the plane ( I would suggest c 70cm). I think your best bet would be to trawl everything available and come back here with those options so people can tell you what to expect from each board.

  2. #9
    Senior Member astroboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
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    114
    Mikerb
    words of wisdom I feel
    I agree with you that something wide and over 120 litres would be good
    and I agree too that despite the prices on some new cool boards they are not going to help me to build a comfortable learning curve
    I shall be patient and will happily post back when something in my ball park comes up
    thanks for the encouragement
    there are a couple of JP freestyle boards at the 150gbp mark but they are just 100 litres which I think is still pushing my luck

  3. #10
    Senior Member astroboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
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    114
    What's up,
    wow getting chilly for swimming but still love it.
    I have the chance to get a couple of boards, was wondering what you all think
    - a tabou manta 125 litres and 80cms wide (not a beginners board as such but ok volume and width)
    - ahd free diamond 70 129 litres 75cms wide (an older freestyle board with volume and width if a little tricky to handle) also comes with a carbon mast, boom, 2 fins, mast extension but the base joint needs to be purchased separately.

    maybe I'll get to start in the winter vacation, the cold weather could put some hair on my chest hahaha !

  4. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,376
    The Tabou is a full on slalom board so I would forget that. Its very short so will feel twitchy off the plane.
    The AHD is actually 70cm wide, but will feel more stable at low speeds as it is quite long. Its also an old board so should be very cheap.
    http://www.windsurfing44.com/matos/A...HD_2002_en.pdf

  5. #12
    Senior Member Navegante's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    40 48'N 14 26'E -Western Med - West South Atlantic
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    2,953
    Tabou Manta without a doubt

  6. #13
    Senior Member astroboy's Avatar
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    Nov 2016
    Posts
    114
    Thanks for the feedback but obviously neither of those boards seems to be a clear winnner. The Tabou is more modern like 2010 the AHD is 2002 but in amazing condition. Getting closer but maybe I should just keep on looking.

  7. #14
    Senior Member PK1111's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,312
    I had an ahd free diamond 70 for 5 years.
    They are well made, very rounded and forgiving to sail.
    They plane very early with a big rig on and stay controllable till it was quite rough. I used mine between 10 and 20 knots, mainly flat water, but sometimes in chop or small waves.

    from memory it had a good array of footstrap options, making it easy to sail.
    Very wide and stable.
    Its not a classic beginners board, and you might quickly find it's too big for you, but then you can always use for light wind sailing.

    Very highly recommended for an intermediate.

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