Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 LastLast
Results 15 to 21 of 38
  1. #15
    Senior Member ross24's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Rickmansworth
    Posts
    654
    Hi Cardy, I used to sail at Datchet quite a lot. It's good there as far as inland venues go. It's a huge reservoir, but it can be a bit tricky getting in and out from the main slip way (in front of the club house), but they have fitted some carpet to the slope as you enter the water to make it easier and less slippery.

    South westerly is generally considered the best wind direction there but you can sail in winds coming from all round really. North easterly to easterly aren't that good as they are offshore from the main launch point by the clubhouse. Plus those wind directions are usually the coldest!

    They've recently invested some money in doing up the changing rooms / showers so they're quite nice now. And it's good to have a hot shower after getting cold and wet. Plus they do food on the weekends.

    Rather than full on gloves maybe get some mitts such as these...

    http://www.boardwisecannock.co.uk/ne...tt-p-4135.html

    I sail all year round. And use those when cold. They allow you to grip the boom so prevent forearms cramping as happens with full gloves.

    I would also definitely recommend a neoprene beanie hat or full on hood. I use both depending on conditions.

    Let us know how you get on, and I may see you down there sometime
    '16: 16
    '17: 9

  2. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    banned
    Posts
    1,703
    Just to add to the head wear points, some people do not get on with the full hood. It seems that many, especially beginners, need to hear the wind and people shouting at them to get out of the way etc. Some find that they just struggle with balance when their ears are covered. Beanies seem to work better for those who struggle with a full hood.

  3. #17
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    18
    OK here we go. All kitted out and a beginner course on this weekend (25th and 26th March) at Datchet. Quite excited really, not really sure if this is going to be successful or complete failure. Looking pretty cold out there though.

  4. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    692
    Quote Originally Posted by Cardy View Post
    OK here we go. All kitted out and a beginner course on this weekend (25th and 26th March) at Datchet. Quite excited really, not really sure if this is going to be successful or complete failure. Looking pretty cold out there though.
    Good luck - hope all goes well. I'm sure you will be fine temp wise.

  5. #19
    Senior Member TwoFish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    towards the right
    Posts
    3,288
    Have fun. Just be aware you're getting into a dangerous addiction .
    Eeeh 'tis grim dahn Sarf.

  6. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    2,488
    I haven't read through but much of the freezing is when changing back after sailing. So whether you have somewhere warm like a van or club house makes a big difference. A hooded suit keeps your head and neck warmer. And Ion claw gloves keep your hands warm without compromising boom grip too much. If you apply rubber glue on the seams they may last more than a few times. Sailing in the cold is not only a question of how much your willing to suffer there and then but potentially also about longer term health issues. I've been out in 5 degrees air temps twice lately if anyone should wonder if I'm a pussy. Even with multiple layers of clothing I find that a bit too low. Nine is fine!
    The infamous wavewriter

  7. #21
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    1
    Cardy, looks like north easterlies saturday and sunday which sounds like the worst direction for Datchet! Air temps look ok and wind looks around force 3 (you might be better off with slightly less to start with).

    It's really important for people to have a positive experience in their first sessions (I know you have tried it on holidays before). I did a weekend course back in the 80s on inland water. The first day was way too windy. People were planing around on the short boards of the day. I had a pretty miserable few hours ending with a trip back to the shore on the rescue boat. It was no day for a beginner and the school should really have asked us to come back another day. Nobody bothered to tell me it was too windy to learn and not knowing any better, I went home briused and fed up thinking this was way too hard & wasn't the sport for me. Very nearly didn't go back the next day. I did though and fortunately it was sunny and warm with a light breeze. Ideal learner conditions and I went home with my RYA level 1 certificate and my life changed forever...!

    However for every windsurfer who got hooked like me I reckon here must be another potential windsurfer who didn't because of poor first few hours experiences. So if you're getting nowhere because it's too windy/cold/offshore from the launch, don't be afraid to pack up and try another day.

    Good luck!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •