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  1. #1
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    Holding the rail

    (Late edit: Based on comments on this thread and some experimentation I've come to the obvious conclusion that a nice carve can't start with pressing on the rail. Unless your body initiates the turn by falling to the inside it'll be very hard to maintain pressure on the rail because of the centrifugal force. In order to fall in and forwards it's important to depower the sail for an instant by efficient oversheeting. It's all very basic and done in all good gybes. But it's still hard to remember when you want to perform a frontside bottomturn on an onshore wave.)

    So how do you set and hold the rail in a bottom turn? In long and fast gybes on flat water I find it easy. In waves with little time to redirect the board and often chop on the waveface it's not so easy. And especially not on the "oversized" board you'll need to catch waves unless you're very good. Basher once introduced the the idea of popping a board onto the plane. Could a sudden pressure on the inside rail of a biggish waveboard cause it to bounce back out of the water and off track? And how about holding the rail through the turn? Do you flex your ankles to the max and apply rail pressure by leaning your hips more or less into the turn? Or do you flex your ankles less and instead apply pressure by using calf muscles or whatever while staying more centred over the board. Stupid questions of course. Let's see if we can still learn something from the replies!
    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 13th January 2017 at 04:56 PM.
    The infamous wavewriter

  2. #2
    Lean forwards. Look where you want to be.

    If you are on a big board, then you need to exaggerate the move.


    There's no 'popping' here.
    Last edited by basher; 30th December 2016 at 04:19 AM.
    I have some kit for sale, to make space. Nuevo 86 2014, £490, Nuevo 73 2013 £550, Severne Blade 2015 5.0 and 3.7. All VGC or little used. Don't use private message system as I don't get messages via here – contact via the weather thread!

  3. #3
    Do you turn your board by banking it over and pushing the inside rail? Or more explicitly: do think about turning in this way? Then stop. Instead think about the board as attached to both your legs and that you are driving it through the arc. Or even better. Think like the arc the board will take is already there. Like tracks with banking and everything. You are standing on the board. To not be thrown off you need to bend your knees and lean inside and forwards _before_ the board.

    There is more to it, but mentally thinking about "surfing the board" instead of "pushing the rail" is a good start.
    Ola H.

    – Simmer Style Boards and Sails –

  4. #4
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    Thanks for expert advice from Basher and OlaH. But don't let that stop others from posting please. As usual this wasn't meant solely as a Tomas-got-a-problem thread.
    The infamous wavewriter

  5. #5
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    You mentioned briefly about the board size, it's all relevant to the conditions and control. If you are on a big board for you size or conditions then this can have an effect on how much you can bury the rail.
    In the last windsurf test they also mentioned that the Goya (I think) board did not respond well to front footed style and trying to engage the rail further forward, this should not maybe taken as it can't but shows that some boards are easier than others and different techniques will be required.

    My tip would be to keep the power on and not sheet out, sheeting out releases the pressure on the rail and will cause it to lift out of the water. Only sheet out if you are going to change direction for the top turn or want to lift the nose to hit a white water section .

  6. #6
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    Interesting point about keeping it sheeted Jamie. I've become good at pointing high clew first without backwinding. But it may be that I sometimes actually open up too early and loose both drive and rail pressure. I should probably go more by feel like in my excellent gybes.

    Trying to turn too much on the steepest part of the wave face could also be an issue. It's my impression that many good sailors in onshore conditions either somehow complete much of the turning already at the top of the wave before heading dtl or instead delay most of the turning till they arrive at the bottom the wave but then really crank it in a lay down slalom gybe style. Or maybe even a mix of the two. Expecting much grip in a close to free fall (even if small) is a lot to ask I guess.
    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 1st January 2017 at 12:16 AM.
    The infamous wavewriter

  7. #7
    Senior Member Witchcraft's Avatar
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    It also depends on the shape of the board. Does it turn more on rocker or on the outline? All boards use a combination of both but the amount varies. If you have a board with a flatter rocker and rounder outline, the rail will catch if it´s dug in too much to the front. So you need to use more the back foot but also there you can stall the board if applied too much. You need to get a feel for the board how it turns, what it handles best and what it doesn´t. And if needed, adapt straps, mast foot and boom positions.

    Keeping sheeted in and sailing clew first is also a must in on shore conditions. If you are sheeting out it also means the sail will pull you away from the wave.
    Bouke
    Witchcraft Windsurfing Fuerteventura

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