Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 LastLast
Results 8 to 14 of 35
  1. #8
    Senior Member Stev-0's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Auckland, NZ - London, UK
    Posts
    4,065
    Make sure feet are well deep into the straps (up to your ankles) as this will give you the leverage you need over the rail to hold it in. Lean really forward into the bottom turn with commitment ...like really committed 100% to the turn and look at the part of the wave you want to hit. Commitment drives intent and your body will respond with more effort which is what drives power into the turn and holds the rail. Use a wider grip on the boom as that helps control the rig and put more drive into the rail. Really important to use your knees like shock absorbers to soak up the chop and any bounce but at the same time always driving the rail/surfing the board through the turn - which is why you need wide straps and your foot way across the centre line of the board. No flexing of the ankle in a bottom turn - you really are pushing through the ball of your front foot (Onshore 60% - Sideshore 80%) and back foot (Sideshore 20% - Onshore 40%) while leaning into the turn.

    A bottom turn can be visualised like a "swoop" - a fast powerful action that has a lot of moving parts that all fire in a sequence that generates speed an holds the rail in to then release all that torque in the top turn. In onshore you need to do as much turning in the bottom turn as you quickly run out of speed and space for the top turn. So with a wide grip get the rig upright open to the wind and turn clew first into the wave and then do a fast snappy/skatey top turn so the rig doesn't backwind on you.

    Best feeling in windsurfing I reckon when you get it right.
    Last edited by Stev-0; 1st January 2017 at 10:46 AM.

  2. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    2,214
    This video from 3:14 to 3:17 gives a nice inside perspective. It strikes me that this sort of lean angle would be impossible without keeping the sail powered up throughout the carve.

    https://vimeo.com/137739352
    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 2nd January 2017 at 09:08 PM.
    The infamous wavewriter

  3. #10
    Member levante's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    too far from the sea
    Posts
    40
    Quote Originally Posted by Jamie.T View Post
    My tip would be to keep the power on and not sheet out, sheeting out releases the pressure on the rail and will cause it to lift out of the water. Only sheet out if you are going to change direction for the top turn or want to lift the nose to hit a white water section .
    Second that:
    picture 1 shows me sheeting out during a turn - mind the nose of the board (windsurf pictures of me always make for a great, bad example )
    picture 2 shows me sheeted in - not radical at all but nose and rail stay low.
    picture 3 shows a grown up doing a bottom turn (in this case Sergio from Sailboards Tarifa).
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	_MG_2089.jpg 
Views:	78 
Size:	81.7 KB 
ID:	14762   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	_MG_2072.jpg 
Views:	84 
Size:	77.2 KB 
ID:	14763   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	_MG_2069.jpg 
Views:	90 
Size:	82.5 KB 
ID:	14764  
    My wind- & surf shirts: http://sonofabeach.spreadshirt.de

  4. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    743
    A picture says a thousand words, well done!

  5. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    2,214
    Thanks for posting Levante! Yes, apart from the board size issue and moving focus towards the lip, I've come to think that we're really back to the rig handling issue. Foot steering a board is not that difficult. But if you just throw yourself into the turn like a beginner gyber you will end up similarily with the nose of the board soaring high and all speed lost. You'll need to keep drive and mast foot pressure through the turn. As indicated above I'll try and focus on fine sheeting the sail through the turn just like when gybing but obviously past the point where I would normally flip the rig. I still believe that swinging the rig out and back on straightish arms will eventually often be required in onshore conditions to avoid back winding while keeping the board turning. But the timing will have to be determined by the pull of the sail rather than some predetermined idea like "hey, I'm just about passing through down wind on a pretty onshore wave so it must be time to really open up the sail ASAP!"
    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 2nd January 2017 at 10:28 PM.
    The infamous wavewriter

  6. #13
    Senior Member Stev-0's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Auckland, NZ - London, UK
    Posts
    4,065
    Critique:

    picture 1 shows me sheeting out during a turn - mind the nose of the board (windsurf pictures of me always make for a great, bad example ) Classic back foot bottom turn like a bad gybe rather than a bottom turn, bouncing out of the turn as the rail is mostly out of the water, rig pulled upright as not leaning into the turn, bottom turned a fraction too early rather than off the bottom, head looking down wind not into the wave.

    picture 2 shows me sheeted in - not radical at all but nose and rail stay low. - Better but no front foot pressure at all just going down the line, not looking at the wave but down wind, hips facing down wind and not into the wave, rig not being driven forward so low mast foot pressure, maybe went a fraction too early as wave not that steep.

    picture 3 shows a grown up doing a bottom turn (in this case Sergio from Sailboards Tarifa) That is a proper bottom turn! Full power off the bottom with front foot driving the rail, knees bent, importantly - hips open and turning turning into the wave and head looking over back hand and into the section to do the top turn which drives all the forces into the mast foot and rail and fins, he has a wide grip on boom and controlling the rig power coming into a clew first position, went for the turn when the wave was most critical for max speed.

  7. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    2,214
    Quote Originally Posted by Stev-0 View Post
    ...bottom turned a fraction too early rather than off the bottom, head looking down wind not into the wave....
    Is it true that you have to either redirect at the top and/or bottom turn hard when almost out in the flats? Trying to carve on the steep part is challenging and takes focus from the section you should be trying to hit.
    The infamous wavewriter

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •