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  1. #15
    Senior Member Stev-0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boards_Tomas View Post
    Is it true that you have to either redirect at the top and/or bottom turn hard when almost out in the flats? Trying to carve on the steep part is challenging and takes focus from the section you should be trying to hit.
    Will it depends...

    Side shore: Mainly yes - you want to crank a bottom turn at the ...er....just at the bottom of the wave to generate the most speed and the arc of the turn will take you out into the flats to load up that rail and fins, then the wave catches up with you just as you hit the lip with full speed.

    X-offshore: When the wind is x-offshore you can fang down the line along the wave as waves will hold up longer and the wind angle means you are broad reaching along the wave so you can do some mid face wiggles and line up an aerial &/or find the section you want to bottom turn into and crank a proper bottom turn then.

    Onshore: You need to carry speed and as you are basically turning dead down wind for a moment and losing speed with little wave energy to surf so you need to turn as tightly as possible in a clew first position to make it to the top turn stage - so less important to turn off the bottom of the wave and more about using the steepest part of the wave to get something to turn on as the top turn is tricky as you are having to really control the upright rig clew first for the bottom turn then get the top turn in quickly before the rig powers up again at the top of the sail and suddenly pulls forward - so need to top turn faster than the wind powers up the rig again.

    Bottom turns are often how style is judged and always how flow is created.

  2. #16
    Here's and old small wave bottom turn sequence in almost dead onshore, that ai think it is bit telling. In particular related to my earlier post. Look at pic 3 where the board is already quite angulated, but with pretty much no pressure on it. This illustrates how the body goes into the turn before the board. So you kind of fall into the turn with quite little rail pressure, then you ind of more push the board as a whole rather that pushing the rail.








    Ola H.

    – Simmer Style Boards and Sails –

  3. #17
    Senior Member Witchcraft's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stev-0 View Post
    Make sure feet are well deep into the straps (up to your ankles) as this will give you the leverage you need over the rail to hold it in.
    That is pretty basic advice, non the less probably the most important of all. Reguraly I get rental boards back with the straps set so narrow you would only see your toes on the other side. Like this you would just lift your heels rather than banking the board over.

    Quote Originally Posted by levante View Post
    Second that:
    picture 1 shows me sheeting out during a turn - mind the nose of the board (windsurf pictures of me always make for a great, bad example )
    picture 2 shows me sheeted in - not radical at all but nose and rail stay low.
    picture 3 shows a grown up doing a bottom turn (in this case Sergio from Sailboards Tarifa).
    These are somewhat unusual conditions for most so maybe not such a good reference. It is pretty windy and cross off, just watch the guy sailing out in the 3rd picture. If you would sheet in like that in cross on, you are bound to get back winded at the end of the bottom turn.
    Bouke
    Witchcraft Windsurfing Fuerteventura

  4. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ola H. View Post
    ...So you kind of fall into the turn with quite little rail pressure, then you kind of more push the board as a whole rather that pushing the rail. ...
    Another good post OlaH! It seems you're already almost in the flats before really cranking it (oops sorry, I mean fall into the turn). With pressure in the sail I guess you both can and should lean in more than you would without. I'm repeating myself but am getting increasingly convinced that the way you "swipe the sail" to open the clew and move the coe rearwards is critical in order to drive the board around rather than just stuff your face into the wave. I guess it's a bit like falling in then catching yourself by the sail. I'm looking forward to try it out. I'm already at the point where I've started getting all the way back up the wave with a litle bit of speed. But looking at someone like Alessio tells me how much more energy there is to be exploited. If he can get two meters above the lip I should at least be able to get my fins dry one day. And maybe even land on the front of the wave.
    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 3rd January 2017 at 01:12 PM.
    The infamous wavewriter

  5. #19
    Senior Member Stev-0's Avatar
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    Ola's photos are classic onshore where the steepest part of the wave is the first image and by the time he bottom turns the wave has broken and turned to mush so the top turn is a bounce off the mush. I sail these conditions a lot and as Ola mentions he is not putting much rail pressure in and pushing/surfing the board initially. In this later image Ola is putting pressure on the back foot to crank a tight turn and is really controlling the rig clew first with a wide grip to keep the sail powered.




    [/QUOTE]
    A good practice for holding the rig in clew first stance is gybing full speed in the straps with the rig upright and sail downwind clew first for a few seconds before carving back up wind on to a reach. Holding the clew first stance with power in the sail is a vital skill for onshore bottom turning as you are turning dead down wind and need to control the COE in the sail until you do the top turn. Actually pretty tricky to do while at the same time trying to see the wave and judge when to top turn.

    Life is easier in side shore winds.

  6. #20
    Member levante's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stev-0 View Post
    Critique:
    ...
    Yes: i suck at port tack wave riding. Just thought the first two pictures illustrate pretty well how, even with my mediocre riding technique, a sheeted in sail will keep nose and rail where they belong.
    Hope i'll be able to catch some days with Levante and swell next month in Tarifa and work my way up towards a more “picture 3 like” bottom turn
    My wind- & surf shirts: http://sonofabeach.spreadshirt.de

  7. #21
    Senior Member Stev-0's Avatar
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    Sheeting in the sail doesn't keep the nose and rail down! That just chokes all the power out of the rig so you can't do anything! Ola is not sheeting in he is controlling the rig clew first so is that other dude. Leaning forward and getting the front arm extended and turning your head and hips into the wave while driving off your front leg buries the rail and so the nose sits low in the water.
    Last edited by Stev-0; 3rd January 2017 at 11:48 PM.

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