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  1. #8
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    14
    Hello,

    I found out that for me it is really important to extend the frontarm and push the mast to the inside of the turn. This does two things:
    First, You automatically sheet in, when You leave the backhand as ist is (hold or sheet in slightly).
    Second it allows to turn the front shoulder and hips into the turn. This leads to a much better position, where You really can engage the rail and hold the nose of the board down. If I am lazy and "forget" to push with the front arm I often do not turn the hips, which makes everthing much more complicated.

    Best regards

    ALex

  2. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    3,725
    I agree with that. I think the advice re moving the back hand back can be misleading. The primary reasons for moving the back hand back are firstly to create a wider grip and more control and second to avoid sheeting out as you bring your body over the centre line towards the inside of the turn ( although if you progressively bend the back arm up to your body that will not happen) . The rig should alrady be correctly trimmed in terms of back hand sheeting angle so no need to sheet in further unless you want to stall the sail in overpowered conditions. What needs to happen is rotation of the rig luff to clew.........and that can be achieved by pushing away and forward with the front hand. The closer the front hand is to the harness line the more that can be done.

  3. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,247
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Very light winds with no hope of planing gybes, but as I was being followed by one of those buzzing things I thought I'd give it a go. 8.5m sail. My back hand is slide down the boom in 1 movement, front hand is pushed away and forwards, I've just sheeted in hard, like I mentioned earlier, to help the initial start of the turn. Knees bent over that chop to absorb it. 2 seconds later not planing wishing there was more wind. I was only doing 17 knots at the start of that gybe.
    When unhooking I try to keep the sail still as I dont want to disturb the airflow. I read somewhere recently about bending the arms to move the boom towards you but I'm not too sure about that in light winds. With the 8.5m I unhook and move my back foot straight away to gybe as I dont want to lose any speed. In stronger winds after I unhook I get lower and dont start to gybe as soon after.

    At Studland with onshore waves, my board speed isnt as quick as flat water (plus the board is more freeride/wave not slalom) as it can be choppy and not clean waves/swell so if I'm powered up I have to sheet in. I unhook earlier to give me time to pick the best spot to gybe. The rig gets flipped later with smaller sails than the big kit. Going down a bit of swell to gybe you have to lean forward, so I might give the idea of moving the front hand back a bit a try. It would be interesting to hear from a proper wave sailor what they do.

    I think its a case of different techniques for different situations.

  4. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Leigh-on-Sea
    Posts
    239
    Funny this comes up just after I have bought a copy of Intuition. Guy Cribb really emphasises that you should extend the front arm to facilitate sheeting in. As well as moving the back hand down the boom.
    I can see how I am a lazy sheeter.
    But its -1 outside, I dont want to go and practice!
    Great topic btw, thanks Tomas.

  5. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    2,447
    [QUOTE
    Great topic btw, thanks Tomas.[/QUOTE]

    And thanks for those kind words. For the second time in sizable waves I've had the luck to spot a breakage in the frontpiece of the boom and got on land before it failed. So I decided that it was time for renewal and splashed out a ridiculous amount on the alu 360 slim. I have one at home so I know that I want it. What's relevant to this topic is I've added a grippy sort of tape on a ten cm stretch of the boom between the front piece and the harness line. It's intended to serve the twin purpose of protecting the boom from wearing out on the rocks of Pozo and remind me to move my front hand closer to the lines.
    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 20th January 2017 at 12:24 PM.
    The infamous wavewriter

  6. #13
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    25
    Quote Originally Posted by boards_Tomas View Post
    I think you're indirectly pointing to an important difference between gybing and bottomturning since in the latter you'll probably be unhooked before moving the back hand.
    In my view that is an important observation because I found no difficulty moving the back hand back with the harness lines a good way back (according to Guy Cribb etc).
    It should be more difficult without unhooking during waveriding when beginning just another bottom turn. Is there a slight pull with the backhand creating a short dynamic Equilibrium, to give you a Chance in the meantime to travel backwards with your back hand one of the answers?
    Kode Wave 82 (2014), Fanatic Triwave 89 (2017), F2 Rebel 75 (2009), F2 Guerilla 84 (2007), Skate 108, powered by Severne S-1 and S-1 Pro
    80 kg, 180 cm

  7. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    2,447
    [QUOTE=domwave;1053387 Is there a slight pull with the backhand creating a short dynamic Equilibrium, to give you a Chance in the meantime to travel backwards with your back hand one of the answers?[/QUOTE]

    Something like that yes I guess. In general the less pressure on the back hand the easier it can be moved. I recently watched a gopro clip off a good female waverider who consistently moved her back hand in two steps.
    The infamous wavewriter

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