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  1. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wing 11 View Post
    I agree with this but if you using TWS method on narrow 90Lfsw boards during railling phase(up to 2/3 turn) you have very narrow stance which is not good for choppy water..
    Possibly. I've just gone back through the original footage from this looking for all the gybes I fell in on and there were about 8 (shocking I know, I couldnt believe it either).
    https://youtu.be/_q3zu3tfRqI

    All the times I fell in it was on or just after the rig flip, except for once I fell in before changing feet, bizarrely in the flattest section of water behind the jetty. I didnt bother making a video of all those when I put this video together last month, maybe I should to see why I kept dropping the rig.

  2. #9
    Junior Member Wing 11's Avatar
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    I watched your video and I think you must put back hand far away back on the boom when start to jibe...
    Or maybe is just bad camera angle so I cant see well..

  3. #10
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    I move the back hand maybe 10cm.

  4. #11
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    Wing...I think you have it exactly right. I first noticed, quite a while ago, Dunkerbeck gybing by first placing his back foot a lot further forward than the traditionally taught position touching the back strap, and then bringing his front foot across behind that foot. As far as I can see most slalom sailors now use that technique. Always difficult to spot on a video because it is so quick but the moment the front foot has applied pressure to the rail, the old back foot is moved forward. Whether it goes straight into the front strap or not really depends on conditions. To be honest I have always thought the "Charlie Chaplin" heel to toe stance was pretty awkward and unstable so have never done it that way.

  5. #12
    Junior Member Wing 11's Avatar
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    Mikerb..

    All PWA slalom sailors use that technique(front foot always behind back "carve" foot),so nobody work foot change like all instructors teach in school...

    Yes, it is hard to see on video,because foot change is too fast,but then you must slow video on x0.25 and playing with start/stop button..
    Last edited by Wing 11; 13th February 2017 at 10:55 PM.

  6. #13
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    I reckon this is one of the better videos on carve gybing in lighter winds/bigger kit.

    https://youtu.be/I3L4l7pSV2A

    Something I've noticed Nick do is when he puts his old front foot into the new back foot position its quite close to the rail of the board. I think this is down to him sailing wide tail RSX boards, to keep them carving through the turn as he switches feet and flips the rig early in the turn in the lighter wind/larger rig scenario. So something to bear in mind when sailing modern wide boards?

  7. #14
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    There are variations though. If you find a video of Kiani Kurosh you see he tend to bring his front foot over almost to the same position (fore/aft) as his back foot but more on the centre line of the board so not the Charlie Chaplin stance. It has the effect of momentarily straightening out the arc though once the pressure on the leeward rail is released by the back foot to move forward. I guess everyone finds their own way!

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