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  1. #8
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    Wing...I think you have it exactly right. I first noticed, quite a while ago, Dunkerbeck gybing by first placing his back foot a lot further forward than the traditionally taught position touching the back strap, and then bringing his front foot across behind that foot. As far as I can see most slalom sailors now use that technique. Always difficult to spot on a video because it is so quick but the moment the front foot has applied pressure to the rail, the old back foot is moved forward. Whether it goes straight into the front strap or not really depends on conditions. To be honest I have always thought the "Charlie Chaplin" heel to toe stance was pretty awkward and unstable so have never done it that way.

  2. #9
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    I reckon this is one of the better videos on carve gybing in lighter winds/bigger kit.

    https://youtu.be/I3L4l7pSV2A

    Something I've noticed Nick do is when he puts his old front foot into the new back foot position its quite close to the rail of the board. I think this is down to him sailing wide tail RSX boards, to keep them carving through the turn as he switches feet and flips the rig early in the turn in the lighter wind/larger rig scenario. So something to bear in mind when sailing modern wide boards?

  3. #10
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    There are variations though. If you find a video of Kiani Kurosh you see he tend to bring his front foot over almost to the same position (fore/aft) as his back foot but more on the centre line of the board so not the Charlie Chaplin stance. It has the effect of momentarily straightening out the arc though once the pressure on the leeward rail is released by the back foot to move forward. I guess everyone finds their own way!

  4. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by phil_in_poole View Post
    I reckon this is one of the better videos on carve gybing in lighter winds/bigger kit.

    https://youtu.be/I3L4l7pSV2A

    Something I've noticed Nick do is when he puts his old front foot into the new back foot position its quite close to the rail of the board. I think this is down to him sailing wide tail RSX boards, to keep them carving through the turn as he switches feet and flips the rig early in the turn in the lighter wind/larger rig scenario. So something to bear in mind when sailing modern wide boards?
    yes..I have watched that video a few times and I think it is particularly relevant for light wind slalom/freerace boards with big rigs in lighter winds. I first found that video when I started to experience getting backwinded on occasions on my big kit. He does the rig flip and foot change very early in the gybe...in fact it is little more than left or right turn...........he also does not bear away before gybing. Very often on big kit in light wind you just loose speed when you bear away so I see the reasoning behind that.

  5. #12
    That opening video is very well done but it's also showing gybing on a slalom board and the wider the board the more extreme you have to apply your weight.

    As far as the foot change goes, that's really about avoiding sinking the tail of the board at the key point in the turn. So, in a any step gybe, you change the foot when the board begins to slow, just ahead of the rig flip and that's something which will vary from day to day and with different boards sailed by different sailors. It also depends on what your path will be on the exit from the gybe. If there are any waves or chop, that again will determine your best course through a turn, and hence the timing of your foot change.


    These gybing videos are very good and helpful to watch for learners. But getting out there and practising, putting in the hours, and perhaps having someone video you is usually an even better way forward. My advice is not to concentrate on the foot change but on the other advice, which is back hand down the board, lean forwards with the rig (bending the knees), and flip the rig early.
    The underlying issue is you are carving a board through a turn, whilst also having to flip the power source. The brain takes a while to learn this complex action, but it's key for the board to stay turning and level.


    You can't take advice online about how and when to change your feet, just as we all leant to walk by practice and not after advice from our parents.
    Last edited by basher; 13th February 2017 at 10:45 PM.
    Now back in the UK.

  6. #13
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    My technique for super smooth and fast gybing on smallish boards with inward set footstraps in well powered conditions.

    1. Place your back foot far forwards after pulling it out of it's strap. I've never found that a narrow stance has stopped me from carving a (smallish) board as tight as I want or has caused (too) serious problems with balance.
    2. Forget about clew first sailing and just spin the rig very swiftly when it goes light.
    3. With the old back foot far forward you can safely place the old front foot behind it without sinking the tail. (I do however sometimes leave the old front foot in its strap and power up the sail switch stance. Very occasionally I then next even push my old back foot into its new front strap before pulling the old one out. I guess I do that when it's bumpy and I struggle with my balance and therefore don't want to give up my old anchor before getting a new one.)
    4. When you have pivoted your old back foot around on its heel and pushed it into its new front strap, you can start to move your old front foot rearwards. How fast and how far mostly depends on the pull in the rig.

    I can easily outgybe almost anyone on any beach with the said technique. Beginners sometimes approach me for advice. All the guys that have gybed badly for ten or thirty years don't. We're still friends though.
    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 14th February 2017 at 05:31 PM.
    The infamous wavewriter

  7. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by basher View Post
    My advice is not to concentrate on the foot change but on the other advice, which is back hand down the board, lean forwards with the rig (bending the knees), and flip the rig early.
    In a thread with the title 'Jibe foot change' thats not great advice. Once someone has mastered the rest of the components concentrating on the foot change is important as it affects board trim.

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