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  1. #8
    Senior Member Tony E's Avatar
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    You could buy a cheap/modernish freestyle board (eg RRD Twintip) and ride that about for a while.

  2. #9
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    No need to get complicated about this.
    The adjustments you need are to use a more upright stance such that you are not pushing across and against the fin(s). In addition the balance between front and back foot is mostly affected by very small changes in boom height and mast foot position in relation to your harness line length ( and harness hook position). A rearward mast foot position and relatively high boom will unweight the front foot...therefore there is more pressure on the back foot. Moving the mast foot slightly forward....which in effect lowers the boom...plus possibly lowering the boom a little, will load the front foot and there is then much less pressure on the back foot. You find the right setting for these by going to extremes one way then the other...then fine tuning into the middle of those extremes. I would say you need to aim for about 60/40% distribution...60% front foot.

  3. #10
    Super Moderator na-omi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony E View Post
    You could buy a cheap/modernish freestyle board (eg RRD Twintip) and ride that about for a while.
    Yup... it'll certainly teach you to stop over-hoofing on the back foot, as they spin away like a tea tray under a heavy back foot

  4. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by mikerb View Post
    .... A rearward mast foot position and relatively high boom will unweight the front foot...therefore there is more pressure on the back foot. Moving the mast foot slightly forward....which in effect lowers the boom...plus possibly lowering the boom a little, will load the front foot and there is then much less pressure on the back foot. ...

    Not sure I agree with that, especially on the board in question.

    With older kit, there was more spread between the feet and the mast foot. And we used more mast rake with older sails to match the boards. With more mast rake you tend to get under the rig and to weight the tail of the board and the fin.

    New boards are shorter, and with the footstrap grouping and mast track closer together.
    You stick the mast foot in the middle of the track and leave it there, and that sets the mast vertical and allows a more twitchy rig setting. You then get your front foot nearer the mast base, and the resultant upright stance then allows you to move your weight backwards and forwards more because you, like the rig, are standing more upright over the board.

    A high boom encourages you to hang off the rig which then weights the mast foot more than your feet, but you don't actually need a higher boom to achieve the same effect – just lean forwards more.

    With the upright stance, you feed the sideways load of the rig to the fins via your back hand which takes the load to the back foot. You can reduce that load by shifting your harness lines back a bit if the fins are spinning out too readily. But you drive the board forwards by pushing forwards with your front foot and, actually, it's good to try and drive the board directing the rig load via the harness lines, with equal weight on both feet (and with a light hand touch on the boom).

    The key to this technique is to keep the mast upright. I generally think this means using the centre and rear half of the mast tack, but never shift the mast foot forwards as that just puts you back in old school stance.


    On slalom gear it's a bit different as with fast kit you may need to increase the distance from fin to mast base. So for slalom gear and faster single fin boards the mast foot position is more of a tuning device to help control railing or excessive tail lift. With multi fin boards we don't generally get excessive tail lift.
    Last edited by basher; 2nd March 2017 at 08:37 PM.
    Now back in the UK.

  5. #12
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    Never thought you would! I find no difference between a slalom board, freewave board or FSW (all modern shorter shapes) in terms of how to set the relative pressure exerted by each foot. The same adjustments alter the balance in my experience. A board either has a lot of tail grip or it does not. It may be by design or it may be something to fix depending on the board. I see nothing special about multi fin set up other than the lack of leeward grip....same as if you use a small wave fin as a single, same as if you use too soft a fin in a slalom board or even with the right fin but before you have gained any speed.

  6. #13
    We all sail different kit, which sets up different experiences and priorities.

    I am surrounded by three distinct tribes here in Cape Town – the slalom guys, the freestylers and the wave heads – and the latter two would never dream of using the front half of their mast tracks.


    This separation becomes really important when offering advice on tuning modern gear.
    Now back in the UK.

  7. #14
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    Really interesting thread this one, although it seems to have wandered a bit, the subject the op started on is exactly where I'm at when it comes to getting off my back foot and into a more upright stance on smaller boards so tips from more experienced windsurfers are greatly appreciated.

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