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  1. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    M25
    Posts
    493
    Thanks for that - I will get my daughter to try it like that, certainly more fun than floundering around for hours without ever getting on a board. You can just sail along, give it a go, fail, uphaul, sail along, repeat until it works. Much more progressive.

    Quote Originally Posted by Graemef View Post
    As everyone has pointed out, master water starting which is not as difficult as it appears if you do it as I'm about to describe. When it first came about (my generation invented it, initially as a device to quickly recover from a gusted header knocking us into the water whilst racing) we went straight from long boards to little 'sinker' 60 odd litre clarke foam surfboards that absolutely could not be uphauled and remain on the surface.
    SO how do you do it? My tip is to learn backwards, start off luffing the board to a near standstill take one foot off step down into the water, then throw the rig forward and pull yourself back of by bearing away, then take both feet off, then when you are proficient at this bit you just have to learn how to fly the rig from the water, this can be achieved initially quite easily by setting the boom low and dragging the rig over the back of the board, there are plenty of instruction videos of this bit, the tricky bit is the actual mount and bear off which you've just learned and how to control the board from the rig whilst treading water, so next time out, try that dismount, good luck, it can be done in an afternoon, I once taught a 60 year old to do it, and that was before 60 was the new 50.

  2. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    191
    Thanks for all the tips guys. If I've understood correctly, think I'll continue on the 145L board until I'm proficient at harness use, regular planing and beachstarts. I'll then learn waterstarts. I'll do all that on the nice stable big board. Once I'm comfortable with all of that, I'll buy myself a smaller board for use at the coast in 10 knots plus, and perhaps swap the 145L for something bigger and more suited to the 6 to 10 knots I get at the lake I also sail at.
    Last edited by BoredAtWork925; 20th April 2017 at 04:23 PM.

  3. #10
    Senior Member Tony E's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Nr Southend Essex
    Posts
    388
    Quote Originally Posted by BoredAtWork925 View Post
    Thanks for all the tips guys. If I've understood correctly, think I'll continue on the 145L board until I'm proficient at harness use, regular planing and waterstarts. I'll then learn waterstarts. I'll do all that on the nice stable big board. Once I'm comfortable with all of that, I'll buy myself a smaller board for use at the coast in 10 knots plus, and perhaps swap the 145L for something bigger and more suited to the 6 to 10 knots I get at the lake I also sail at.
    If you have access to a beach which is tidal and has a shallow beginning and end of tide, you can get used to a smaller board whilst you are learning the waterstart (eg sail it in mainly shallow conditions). This is a reasonable idea because (a) Its easier to learn to waterstart on smaller kit in windier conditions (b) its a lot easier to learn the straps with smaller kit. Before doing this I would say its worth getting your harnessing sorted out, but once you are looking to get into the back-strap and IF you can get to a suitable beach to try this its worth doing. The same shelving beaches are the best place to learn to waterstart anyway rather than deep water on big kit in marginal conditions.

  4. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    692
    Back when I started there was huge steps in difficulty as you progressed to smaller boards. Anything shorter than 3m was very thin and tippy so even with over 100l of volume boards were difficult to uphaul and generally difficult to sail at low speeds. Things are very different now, a 120l board with 65cm+ of width will be pretty stable and uphauling would not be massively harder. I would encourage you to concentrate on water starting and core skills as that unlocks the door to the golden land of high wind sailing, but I’d also suggest you try a smaller board (c120l) if you can get hold of one or hire one. You may find that something’s are easier and the challenge of sailing more advanced kit pushes you on.

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