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  1. #8
    Senior Member
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    Yes, and MTFU! If you can

    Story of my life, my only defence is that I'm the wrong side of 60.

  2. #9
    Senior Member
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    Nov 2009
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    Going broad with that size of kit becomes far easier if the board and rig are suitably tuned. A very upright and large fin may give good reaching and upwind work but will be harder to take off the wind and maintain speed. Using a slightly smaller fin with more rake will be more willing to turn off the wind and keep the nose higher. The rig is best set with less outhaul and more downhaul. Outhaul can be adjusted on the fly and if you intend doing broad off the wind work the downhaul should be set accordingly. For me the technique is very bent back leg and a feeling of applying pressure down on the tail of the board. I have used Isonic 127 and Rocket Wide 128 in those conditions. The Isonic was more frightening but confidence grows when you trust the board to perform. The RW is far easier and not the least threatening.

  3. #10
    Senior Member
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    The rig is best set with less outhaul and more downhaul.

    Good point. I'm probably running a bit too fine/flat.

  4. #11
    Senior Member
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    Apr 2004
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    1,247
    Some talk here about weaving through swells. The racers and PWA slalom guys training in Tenerife go straight going 30+ knots. Their technique is to get the board "flying" with very little in the water and maybe that avoids taking off at the lip.

  5. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Maker View Post
    Some talk here about weaving through swells. The racers and PWA slalom guys training in Tenerife go straight going 30+ knots. Their technique is to get the board "flying" with very little in the water and maybe that avoids taking off at the lip.

    I wonder if we can get bogged down on the different use of language here?

    I realised the other day that I often still use dinghy sailor's language when describing technique.

    Formula sailors will have their own language. Obviously a Formula board is a great wide sticky thing with a lot of wetted area – and it needs to be well-powered for the hull to be 'flying', which I'd prefer to describe as 'riding off the fin'.
    Getting most of the hull clear of the chop is obviously going to avoid plowing through it.

    But there's also chop, and then there's bad chop, and then there are waves and then there can be a rolling swell with chop. So what works best will also depend on where you are sailing.

    My dinghy sailor language would still describe going downwind as 'snaking through waves and chop to take a path of least resistance' but on a shortboard the need to keep planing is also obvious, and you need to be well-powered to keep planing 'off the fin' when sailing broad. It's more dinghy language to talk about bearing off in the gusts and heading slightly higher in the lulls – and you do that as part of your snaking path. In practice, this becomes part of your intuitive driving skills.

    In chop, there's also sometimes a technique where you rail the board slightly to cut through chop – and this is something I even do on my wave boards.


    The idea to add more downhaul and slacken the outhaul for sailing more downwind is to increase twist in the sail, because when heading broad off the wind there is more variation in apparent wind direction at the head of the sail compared to lower down.


    In a course race, you won't be adjusting downhaul on the fly with a planing shortboard, but an adjustable outhaul can be quickly slackened to induce more twist for the downwind legs, and then re-tensioned to tighten the leech for upwind work.
    Last edited by basher; 20th June 2017 at 04:11 PM. Reason: best not 'bets'
    Now back in the UK.

  6. #13
    Senior Member Graemef's Avatar
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    When you have no idea what you're talking about, writing screeds and screeds of bollox doesn't help anyone and no I wasn't talking about longboards, I sail Formula from time to time and I have also raced slalom and raced it deep and here's the news, if you can't pump, like you, you'll end up last.

  7. #14
    Thing is, if you're actually 'flying' – or sailing off the fin – then pumping would just unsettle the board.

    If you're not fully planing and the conditions are more marginal, then, yes pumping might help.

    If you are mis-steering up the back of a wave however, then pumping won't help. With a wave behind you, it's a different matter.



    My experience of sailing downwind – which I do all the time – is that you initially head across the wind at full speed to get fully sheeted in, and then bear away as much as you can without losing planing speed. If you start to lose speed then, rather than pump, you head up a little. Although in practice, you just snake a path that works with the waves and the gusts and lulls.


    I'd also add that it's not easy to pump a rig with a slack outhaul.
    Now back in the UK.

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