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  1. #8
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    6
    Thanks all. The BIC fell through (outbid) so the search continues :-)
    But I still have the current setup so all good.

  2. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    103
    Quote Originally Posted by springtide View Post
    Thanks all. The BIC fell through (outbid) so the search continues :-)
    But I still have the current setup so all good.
    There are two facebook groups that are excellent for sourcing kit. Windsurfing stuff for sale or wanted and windsurfing kit for sale. I sourced all my gear through these sites and I think there are some beginner / intermediate packages on there.

    There may also be local windsurf groups / pages.

  3. #10
    Senior Member astroboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    114
    Hey
    great to see that you are getting back into WS
    I bought an old Starboard Isonic 122 for around 50 gbp and a WS friend gave me a NP 5.3 sail. The sail was a gem to learn with, easy to set up and nice to control. The Isonic is a bit tippy rail to rail but I love it and am used to it now, it took me about 2 weeks to get into it

    I put nearly all my money into the mast - I picked up a 430 85% carbon Ricardo Ricci - I found watching guys set up their rigs and talking to them about what they are looking for really helped me -
    I can tune the sail now for good control and put in the right amount of DH and OH

    You can't go wrong with a big wide board, you don't have to worry about balancing and can concentrate on sailing, get your tack and jibe down and then looks for something faster

    have fun !

  4. #11
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    6
    Thanks all for the replies.

    I have managed to find a Fanatic Viper hardboard very cheap (bit battered) and a sail or two from another setup that came with a Tabou Rocket 150L... so hopefully now good to go, the intention I can start using the Rocket once I am better.

    I'm looking for an alternative safe place to sail from South Cerney. I can generally stay upwind (as long as there is wind) with the inflatable board and sail, but the wind around the Cotswold lake is all over the place... think it being surrounded by trees doesn't help and someone mentioned improves once the leaves from from the trees have dropped.

    I've been looking at Llandegfedd lake as it's probably similar distance from Bristol. Anyone have any comments about this place? It would be useful to find somewhere that was open locally in the evening, although probably loosing light rapidly at the moment so would only help for a few weeks.
    Last edited by springtide; 2nd October 2017 at 09:22 AM.

  5. #12
    Senior Member astroboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    114
    Just use the Tabou Rocket, it's a great board
    stay close to shore and don't go out in offshore conditions, work on always staying upwind, just keep trying to fast tack when you are out and jybe when you are back in - you will soon improve and before you know it you are planening.

  6. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    191
    I'd second the above, but if you're an absolute beginner then I'd recommend a smaller sail. Like all the beginners at the school I learnt at, I started with a 3.5m sail in 6-7 knot winds (I think the big guys over 80kg got 4.0m sails and the skinner people under 60kg got 3.0m sails, but most of us were on 3.5m sails). I know now we're all experienced that sounds far too small, but it was perfect back then for an absolute beginner, no only because of the lack of pull, but also the lack of weight for uphauling and manouvering, because when there's not much force in the sail you have to manhandle it everywhere. After two or three sessions I was on a 4.0, and then after five or six sessions a 4.5m, which I stuck with for the first year, firstly in winds of 7 knots and eventually in winds of around 15 knots. The 4.5m was the first battened sail that I'd used, the others being loose beginners ones. To save money I guess a beginner could start with a 4.5, but I'd have thought a 5 or a 5.3 would be too big.

  7. #14
    Senior Member astroboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    114
    @Bored
    good advice, a small sail lets you get confidence and 'feel' the board rather than spending all your energy on uphualing and falling in. I guess I was fortunate, I started in spring and the winds were often really light.
    I think a wide board in light winds a 5.0 should be ok for most guys in good shape, but I agree with you, a small sail, big board and big fin is a great way to get going !

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