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  1. #1
    Senior Member crossy5575's Avatar
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    Dec 2009
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    London / Shoreham
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    642

    Stubby in bump and jump

    Hi all,
    I took my stubby 88 out last week at Shoreham - it was ideal weather 5.3 /4.7 for the board, however i really struggled to get the board settled. There was quite big rolling swell, but also quite lumpy in between.

    While sailing I actually got to the point of feeling quite sea sick because i was bouncing around. This got me thinking - I love my stubby, it planes early, works really well in waves and wave sailing, especially in the mush we get on the south coast - however with the thicker nose i wonder if others have felt it lacking in speed in bump and jump because the nose bounces on chop rather than a 'traditional' board which kind of absorbs it.

    I have a Frugal 77 which might have been better for the job on Weds - however with the higher tide and gusty wind wanted to make sure i had the volume... Definitely on some of the wave rides -( about logo 3/4 mast high) the 88 felt too bouncy on the wave to properly sail it - despite the sail size being right.

    Maybe this is a thread on board size vs sail size, but one would have imagined that the combo was right - and i wouldn't have really wanted to go on the 4.7 not fully powered on a 77 (i am 86kgs by the way.

    any thoughts
    Currently on Simmer Blacktips, Simmer Frugal 77, Fanatic Stubby 88, JP xcite ride 120 and AHD Summerboard windsup.

  2. #2
    Surely this is just about board size?

    I understand the Stubbies 'ride quite big' so the 88litre version has the tail width of a bigger board. So it planes early and yet gets bouncy in chop or once it's 4.7 weather.


    The fin configuration may help settle any board but the float will still determine the ride in choppy or wavey conditions.


    You could make an 88litre board ride better in chop with more vee and softer rails and with a narrower tail but it wouldn't plane so early.


    (Mind you, the sea was a mess that day. The chop was bad at Worthing as well.)
    Now back in the UK.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Gorgesailor's Avatar
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    Dec 2009
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    502
    Quote Originally Posted by crossy5575 View Post
    Hi all,
    I took my stubby 88 out last week at Shoreham - it was ideal weather 5.3 /4.7 for the board, however i really struggled to get the board settled. There was quite big rolling swell, but also quite lumpy in between.

    While sailing I actually got to the point of feeling quite sea sick because i was bouncing around. This got me thinking - I love my stubby, it planes early, works really well in waves and wave sailing, especially in the mush we get on the south coast - however with the thicker nose i wonder if others have felt it lacking in speed in bump and jump because the nose bounces on chop rather than a 'traditional' board which kind of absorbs it.

    I have a Frugal 77 which might have been better for the job on Weds - however with the higher tide and gusty wind wanted to make sure i had the volume... Definitely on some of the wave rides -( about logo 3/4 mast high) the 88 felt too bouncy on the wave to properly sail it - despite the sail size being right.

    Maybe this is a thread on board size vs sail size, but one would have imagined that the combo was right - and i wouldn't have really wanted to go on the 4.7 not fully powered on a 77 (i am 86kgs by the way.

    any thoughts
    Sounds like the conditions they had at Sylt! Interestingly Victor Fernandez & Adam Lewis both chose Stubbies in the messy big onshore stuff. Maybe just need to get used to how the board rides in those conditions to get the most of it? Of course a more traditional board may be easier - especially if you don't have the skills of a PWA pro...

  4. #4
    I don't think it's a stubby related issue. I think that it might be size, but even more likely board trim. Our (proto) stubby in fact runs very well when oversized as far as straight line sailing goes. Even better than the more rockered frugal. The straighter outline curve, fast v based rocker and short tail all help with control. I reckon the Fanatic should not be very different.

    But control issues can come come in different flavours, so perhaps you can explain a bit more. Where you fully powered up? Then, if the nose hits too much you could for example move the rear fin back, use smaller fronts or a larger rear. Anything that moves the center of effort of the fin cluster back a bit. This will make the nose rise. And in addition, with the fins further back you need to lean the sail a bit back too to balance things up and this also takes away some mast foot pressure. So overall the front of the board will ride a bit lighter on the water, so to say. Slightly more downhaul in the sail does similar thing too (because it drives the coe of the sail down, and then you need to lean the sail back more to balance it up).

    In general, control is ultimately a lot about balance and trim. With stubby shapes, which has more nose area actually, you'll need a bit more fin power to lift the nose up. With other modern short wave boards, there is much less nose, and you can get away with a slightly flatter riding board. Nuances, but still important.
    Last edited by Ola H.; 18th November 2017 at 12:41 PM.
    Ola H.

    Simmer Style Boards and Sails

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