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  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    236

    New Simmer stubby?

    Any one have any info on the new simmer stubby wave board?
    release dates in the UK?

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by nmoore View Post
    Any one have any info on the new simmer stubby wave board?
    release dates in the UK?

    Try reading one of the many Simmer board threads on here.
    Now back in the UK.

  3. #3
    Senior Member tooold2dance's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    nice house with horses, cats dogs, and bride. USA
    Posts
    6,233
    http://forums.boards.co.uk/showthrea...aveboard/page2

    2nd page has some info on Simmer. Probably more threads.

    oh, so long as you post threads to his Lordships tastes in gear.. it’s ok


    K4 Fins 4Boards TRI-sails Sailrepair




  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    217
    Would be nice to hear what's different compared to the freegal...

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by nmoore View Post
    Any one have any info on the new simmer stubby wave board?
    release dates in the UK?

    I have no set date for delivery of the new models. I'll check and see if I can get an update from the factory. I'll happy to answer any particular questions. I'm very happy about this shape. Of course, I generally like my own shapes, but I'm kind of a sceptic by heart and every board has it's upside and downside. This one though has an unusually broad application.

    The release text for the board follows:


    THE SIMMER STYLE STUBBY PROJECT

    Ola Helenius and the Simmer R&D team have been working continuously the past 18 months on a new board concept which we have named the Cortex.
    The Cortex is our new wave sailing tool, combining speed, flow, short length, and outright unsurpassed looseness out of all our boards made to date. Despite the very short length, Cortex is very easy to sail, and offers uncompromised performance for our top team riders. The Cortex is a board with a huge performance spectrum.

    The Cortex may be a short board, but it has a long history. The rocker, spiral v and concave profile has its the roots in the original Simmer freewave board. When Kai Katchadourian needed a dedicated board for Peahi, aka Jaws, the controlled but still turny freewave shape was chosen to form the basis for the unparalleled speed and control that such a board requires. Freewave was a great hit and the dependable bottom shape has since been used in a variety of shapes in our prototype process. The most exciting of those designs became Cortex where the fast and controlled bottom, based on a progressive rocker flow and double concave v bottom, is combined with a parallell outline and smooth rails. This creates a board that is an awesome performer for real world conditions where it delivers snappy turns and quick reactions. Kai's original spiral V-bottom Peahi Board's heritage still shines through on rail stability and general control through rough conditions, yet Cortex and it's short length and aggrsssive stance has changed the game forever.

    The mechanics of this shape is a combination of several design choices; The fast and controlled bottom combined with a sleek, low entry outline provides excellent flow around sections especially in slower waves. The squared off nose allows the board to fit in tighter parts of shorter trough waves while still allowing a long rail line for solid full rail carves. The shortened diamond tail and accelerating v-angle frees the board up quickly for enhanced shorter turns and ultra quick rail-to-rail performance. The parallell outline converges into the tail with ample area under foot providing lift for early planing and lots of pop for aerials and jumps. Cortex possesses the ability to adapt to different turning angles and come around super smoothy thru turns. With the stance set as far back as possible, the inner angled rear section adds grip in top turns, and extra torque in tight bottom turns. In addition, a pulled back mast track gives the rider the choice of freeing up the board even more by placing the mast in the rear of the box, or to stabilize it for longer turns or jump oriented sailing by placing the mast foot slightly further forward.

    Cortex comes standard with five fin boxes and rides very well in a variety of fin setups. Depending on conditions and preferences, one can set up Cortex as a quad with 9.5cm - 10.5 fronts and 14-15 rear fins.Otherwise a rear fin dominated thruster, with 9.5-10.5 fronts and 17-20cm rears has been a standard set up as well.

    Versaility and snappiness with a user friendly feeling to enhance your ride. Simmer Style Cortex will change the way you look at an average day.
    The Cortex will come in four sizes.



    78 liters, 213x56.0
    84 liters, 215*57.0
    90 liters, 215*58.0
    99 liters, 217x60.0

    Ola H.

    Simmer Style Boards and Sails

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    3
    The shape sounds thoughtful and really nice for "real world wavesailing". What about the construction, will it be lighter than the G3 boards? Full S-glass/carbon construction? Weight of an 90l cortex?
    I know a few people really liked the relatively narrow footstrap width of the G3 boards (14 cm). Same strapwidth on the Cortex? What about toe in on the front boxes vs centre fin (thruster set up)?

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by ultimoamore View Post
    Would be nice to hear what's different compared to the freegal...
    The concepts are very different in fact. The Freegal has a fast tail, but a curvy center and the outline is compact by means of being very curvy, in particularly front-center. This makes it relatively easy, fast and stable to sail once planing, but there is still an element of technicality to get it planing. On the wave it prefers to be on a rather "full" rail in the sense of a lot of angulation. It prefers a rather short bottom turn with some power. The original Frugal (As well as my own boards) are even more pronounced in this respect, but it is still a notable characteristic of the Freegal.

    The Cortex has a flat center rocker and is generally flatter too, but also sports a v-bottom that keeps it going fast rail to rail. The outline is in fact very straight, in particular front-center. This both makes the Cortex less technical for planing, but also affect the turning characteristics. The Cortex stays smoother in a longer turn, fx when going around sections and overall has a more traditional feel. But with the shorter tail is still comes around very fast. A bit of a "problem" for me is that the boards I ride myself are kind of extreme. Small, curvy and with lots of rocker. My production boards (and others) often feel a bit dull. But the Cortex is the first board I seled which is both super easy and also fit my personal sailing.
    Ola H.

    Simmer Style Boards and Sails

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