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  1. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    1,363
    Quote Originally Posted by astroboy View Post
    Thanks so much for all the input
    I find myself having a hard time following some of the suggestions. Probably I will stick with the isonic and be more disciplined and have more organised focused sessions, trying to improve on one or two main points.

    What I don't really want to do is spend money on a board that is too similar to what I have. On the other hand I don't see narrow boards being any fun in the light wind days, and even when it's howling our way I see lots of guys blasting over 50kph on wide slalom boards - what I like about the wider one's is they appear to have huge wind range - ie one board does it all - paired with 3 or 4 sails,
    does that make sense ?
    Totally depends on water conditions. If it stays flat wider boards will cope, but aren't really fun.( or as much fun as appropriate board for conditions)
    We,ve seen top sailors struggle getting down wind on large kit when it really picks up... In overpowered conditions slalom/ wide shoot upwind only too well...meaning occasionally a reverse walk of shame.
    If I were you I,d do 3 things
    A) Avoid big Gecko. ( or any of them for that matter)
    B) Learn to waterstart.
    C) Get a second board to enjoy when it does blow. Compromising on your one board can mean you have a jack of all conditions...master of none.Decide what you want to sail in, what you enjoy, what you feel comfortable with and build you equipment around those choices.

  2. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    692
    Agree with alphie, the issue you have is your current board is both big but quite high speed focused. In an ideal world you would have a more all round big board. I'd stick with what you have until you work out what best suits you and the conditions. I think you will end up with something like a 110 freeride but not until you can water start and are comfortable in the harness and straps.

  3. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    3,876
    I feel obliged to counter the suggestion that the shorter wider boards are only suitable for flat water. Firstly the vast majority of boards are shorter and wider these days and that applies to most of the disciplines. How short and how wide is of course a matter of degree and there is no guarantee that every brand will get the design right.....and that has been the case for many years. I have pointed out before in this thread that slalom boards are not for beginners or even intermediates simply because they require careful tuning, a fin that is of high enough quality to cope with the forces properly and the willingness/skill to control it whilst it rides on a very small section of the tail. All of that does not mean other boards with similar lengths/volumes/widths have the same characteristics. For example I use a Rocket Wide...108 litres, 73cm wide, 240 long. I previously used an Isonic 107...107 litres, 69 ( then..now 71) wide, 235 long. I have used the RW with sails from 5.8 to 7.3 in both flat and choppy conditions and it performs perfectly....but very differently to the Isonic 107. The Isonic was best with 7.8 but worked OK down to 6.3 ( cammed slalom sails).
    I know some have tried the newer wide freeride boards and do not get on with them. They do require some change of technique compared to the traditional longer narrower boards; however if like me you have been previously using slalom boards, they feel familiar but without the vices.
    Fortunately both types are board are still available so people can chose. I have used both and my observation at least as far as the Rocket Wide is concerned in comparison to all of the various freeride boards of similar volume I have previously owned, is that the new generation of boards have a much wider wind range and ( contrary to some comments) cope with a far greater range of water conditions. There are a couple of similarities to slalom boards however, and they may account for poor experiences for some. In my experience they need a good quality fin and one somewhat smaller than might be expected. They also need some tuning in terms of mast track position to maximise both low wind performance and high wind control. Just like slalom boards the primary reason for this being that the wide section of the board delivers stability and early planing but then needs to kept clear of the water in stronger rougher conditions.

  4. #25
    Senior Member astroboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    114
    @mikerb - that post was very interesting and informative. My original problem of having difficulty attaining the straps and maintaining control makes more and more sense.

    In light winds I find the isonic really easy. In other conditions and perhaps with the addition of different material I found several problems. I felt that I was seriously underperforming and just 'not getting it'.

    It seems to me that with this board and my level it is pretty much part of the learning curve. I haven't had a session for a few days and might not be able to get out this week, we'll see. It's not always easy for me to nuance with my WS colleagues because of language difficulties so the forum is such an encouragement for me (thanks to all for your contributions this year and all the best for the year ahead )

    I watch people, videos and take notes. Then try to transfer that knowledge into experience on the water (good rather than bad experience...) It's hard because every session has different wind forces and direction - so it means you may be setting up you kit inadequately for that day. And what you learned the day before may need to be tweaked because it's now onshore instead of cross shore etc.

    From reading around the forum I can more clearly identify some areas to work on. If I keep coming back with my results I feel that I can nail the foundations of good windsurfing. 'If' I get my hands on a more intermediate friendly board that may help too. Until then I'll try to absorb the advice I am getting and make progress.

    The next big goals are planing under complete control, gybing with some serious speed, and when it warms up some - the infamous water start.
    Last edited by astroboy; 26th December 2017 at 09:11 AM.

  5. #26
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    3,876
    I admire your determination and willingness to learn. Use your Isonic in light to medium winds but keep it well powered with a decent sized sail and try to get a good fin for it. Whenever it becomes possible go for more user friendly board at some stage for stronger conditions and you will be amazed how easy it is by comparison to your Isonic. Have a good Xmas.

  6. #27
    Senior Member astroboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    114
    I shall shamelessly profit from all your experience (kind of still on topic for advice about using the footstraps)

    what would it 'feel like' for me to sail

    - Goya one pro 105 litres
    - Starboard atomIQ 99

    cheers

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