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  1. #8
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    4
    Thanks for the tips. I was expecting that modifying strap positions doesn't gain popularity


    me: 190cm, 87kg,
    board: mistral vision 130l , 273cm x 65cm


    This is my first non-beginner board. I've sailed it less than 10 times, 7.5m sail. No jibes or waterstarts.


    The last time on water I lengthened the lines and it felt somehow better. Mast foot position is usually in max forward (as some suggest the mast rail in this board is too back). I'll try mid position next season.


    The plywood modification sounds interesting. If I can't solve this by technique, I'll try that. On the other hand, I could buy a helmet and accept some level of uncertainty in my balance. Considering this my training board so some dents should be acceptable (in board, not me) .


    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	15864

  2. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by shlogger View Post
    Thanks for the tips......

    Mast foot position is usually in max forward (as some suggest the mast rail in this board is too back). I'll try mid position next season.




    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	mistral.jpg 
Views:	45 
Size:	19.0 KB 
ID:	15864


    There's your problem. You were mis-informed. Try it in the middle of the track.
    If you measure from the tail, the centre of the mast foot on this type of board should probably be at 135cms or less. On some modern boards it's more like 130cms.
    Now back in the UK.

  3. #10
    Senior Member Gorgesailor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    502
    Quote Originally Posted by shlogger View Post
    Thanks for the tips. I was expecting that modifying strap positions doesn't gain popularity


    me: 190cm, 87kg,
    board: mistral vision 130l , 273cm x 65cm


    This is my first non-beginner board. I've sailed it less than 10 times, 7.5m sail. No jibes or waterstarts.


    The last time on water I lengthened the lines and it felt somehow better. Mast foot position is usually in max forward (as some suggest the mast rail in this board is too back). I'll try mid position next season.


    The plywood modification sounds interesting. If I can't solve this by technique, I'll try that. On the other hand, I could buy a helmet and accept some level of uncertainty in my balance. Considering this my training board so some dents should be acceptable (in board, not me) .


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	mistral.jpg 
Views:	45 
Size:	19.0 KB 
ID:	15864
    While I agree with Alphie in general - you can change a boards intended character &/or customize it for non "average" body types. In this case the board shown has pretty normal looking strap positions & your size & weight is in the upper realms of "average". I would definitely look at mast foot position, boom height, sail tuning, & harness line position as your main culprit. Particularly if you are running smaller sails, you need to run the track in the middle or even further back if they are modern sails with more forward C.O.E. Also as mentioned you can tune your sails to be less pitchy & lower the C.O.E by adding a bit more downhaul. Hope this helps!

  4. #11
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    4
    I just had season opening with 8.2. Wind was quite gusty. I realized that on slow speeds I couldn't move front foot to footstrap as tail would sink and nose turned upwind, which meant swimming for me. By slow I mean (approximately) 1-14 kts (20 being max). Also those higher speed runs with both feet in straps got problematic once there was a lull, leading to same result.


    Perhaps I just need more speed? Or board with wider tail? Or lose weight?

  5. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    678
    It's just technique. You will get there. I sailed a vision 130 for years at 190cm and 115kg. You need to get planing off the wind FAST before you get into the front strap and then the back strap before you start going across the wind. The secret is comiming your weight to the harness. Don't change anything except moving the mast track back to about 30% from the back. These boards were designed to be powered up off the back of the track.
    Keep with it!

  6. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    692
    What you describe happens to the best of us in marginal winds. Keep at it. Technique will help but st the same time if there is not enough power then there is not enough power! Don't beat yourself up sail out of the straps and keep working on little adjustments to your stance to see what helps.

    When there is enough power in the sail you can commit your weight against it and buy doing that and leaning forward into the rig you can take a lot of weight off your feet and getting in the straps is no problem.

    knowing when there is enough comes with practice.

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