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  1. #1
    Senior Member Witchcraft's Avatar
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    Beach Bum Survey

    Interesting and worrying article (for north sea users in the first place):

    Exposure to and colonisation by antibiotic-resistant E. coli in UK coastal water users: Environmental surveillance, exposure assessment, and epidemiological study (Beach Bum Survey)

    It says that coastal waters have a higher content of multi-resistant bacteria and that water users such have surfers have 3 times higher chance of carrying such bacteria.
    Last edited by Witchcraft; 31st January 2018 at 06:42 PM.
    Bouke
    Witchcraft Windsurfing Fuerteventura

  2. #2
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    Whilst not wishing to dismiss all scientific research I think it is worth remembering that research scientists depend on funding grants to survive. The main point of this report is to secure more funding for further research. There are 2 classic ways to do that. First provide a preliminary study convincing enough to persuade either pharmaceutical companies there is potential for profit, or Governments, that there is a huge risk to public health ( fear!); second, make the detail of the preliminary study so complex that only other scientists would understand it ( but provide a summary/conclusion..which may or may not be wholly justified).
    The counter argument is rarely seen. The control studies are never done ( e.g. what else do surfers have in common which could explain a higher incidence of E coli ......diet, age group, etc).
    I could mention other current major scientific research led initiatives with similar flaws but that would start a whole new thread!!

  3. #3
    Senior Member FKPhil's Avatar
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    The paper mentions that other explanations are not excluded. Seems like a good study with sound conclusions to me.
    But I’m gullible so yes it was all just made up for more funding.
    Last edited by FKPhil; 1st February 2018 at 08:52 PM.
    Writing nonsense on tinternet since 1842.

  4. #4
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    And this is just the bacteria. Viruses are all resistant to antibiotics anyway. You are also more susceptible to infection just above the water - in the aerosol zone - than when you are in it. I think I need to borrow mikerb's tinfoil hat.

  5. #5
    So if there is a greater risk of surfers getting this resistant super bacteria, and the study mentions a link of them swallowing around 10x more seawater than other swimmers, so that implies that they are getting the bacteria from the ocean. Have we created/been harboring these superbacteria in the flora and fauna of the ocean too? I thought that it was just a very big problem on farms and such, hoping someone could inform me.

  6. #6
    Senior Member tooold2dance's Avatar
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    Do i understand that this bacteria make antibiotics not perform ?

    Given the number of available antibiotics available surely it cant effect all.
    I sailed once in the UK waters in October, I was sick a week after for near a month. No antibiotics were in use. Most likely the water was not to blame, I have experienced some ill effects from my local water.


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  7. #7
    Senior Member TwoFish's Avatar
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    And whilst I take the point that the real message is that there's far too much sh!t in the sea that we're swallowing, I'm not as clear what the personal / collective implications for us are of carrying these super-e-coli chaps:

    - Does it mean we're at greater personal risk of illness as a result of having been colonised, or
    - Does the fact we're carriers, but not sick, mean that we're actually fine (or perhaps even that we're developing an immunity to them), but that we in turn could cause some sort of pandemic if we start pooing in landlubbers' food?

    Science guys / medics, can you enlighten?
    Eeeh 'tis grim dahn Sarf.

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