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  1. #8
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    According to the WHO E Coli exists almost everywhere even in grit and soil. The issue is I suppose how it transfers from the world around us to our gut...which is why food is the most common way it gets there ( both for us and animals). We are pretty careful to cook and handle food properly to the extent that the biggest risk comes from food that is not cooked...e.g salad. Likewise with water. Stands to reason that if we "drink" sea water, there is a risk. The issue is the degree to which it is an additional risk over and above get out of bed every day! Added to that all of us have E Coli in our gut..together with thousands of other bacteria good and bad. Our immune system largely deals with it. So all of this is a matter of balance in my book.

  2. #9
    Senior Member tooold2dance's Avatar
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    Mikerb

    What I gather from the “study” is once the bacteria is established in our body, then the use of antibiotics , with a condition /illness that requires them, the bacteria fights off the antibiotics , making them unable to do their job.


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  3. #10
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    E. coli is a normal part of the gut flora. Certain strains are poisonous.

  4. #11
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    Just to be clear, the research was into the amount of antibiotic resistant E. coli present in coastal waters. As a first attempt to quantify this it seems to me to be valuable.

    The research was support by Surfers against Sewage which participated by recruiting surfers to be tested for antibiotic resistant E. coli. Well done SAS.

    11 of the sea water samples taken at 97 locations were found to contain antibiotic resistant E. coli and 9% of surfers were found to be carriers.

    https://www.sas.org.uk/uncategorised...esults-are-in/

    The lessons of the research are surely more for public policy than for individual surfers - the need for controls on the use of antibiotics and for the effective treatment of sewerage pumped into the sea.

    For the rest of us the best advice must be to keep your mouth shut and never swallow.
    Last edited by MartinJ; 7th February 2018 at 06:43 PM.

  5. #12
    Senior Member tooold2dance's Avatar
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    Umm, what percentage of non surfers are carriers ? As: is this really a worldwide epidemic or , the sky is falling ?


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  6. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by tooold2dance View Post
    Mikerb

    What I gather from the “study” is once the bacteria is established in our body, then the use of antibiotics , with a condition /illness that requires them, the bacteria fights off the antibiotics , making them unable to do their job.
    Not quite......if it is the antibiotic resistant bacteria that is causing the illness then yes a course of antibiotics is not going to provide a cure. That is different than saying the E coli bacteria disables a course of antibiotics. Doctors are already advised to restrain from prescribing antibiotics whenever possible because many bacteria are mutating to the extent the antibiotics do not kill them and development of new antibiotics is not keeping pace. Recently people have also been advised against extensive use of anti bacterial cleansers etc throughout the house because it can be counter productive especially to children. The theory being that exposure to low levels of various bacteria is what enables their immune systems to build resistance to various bacteria. SAS ( understandably) will jump onto any research which appears to assist their central aim of preventing the pollution of coastal waters from sewerage outflows.

  7. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by tooold2dance View Post
    Umm, what percentage of non surfers are carriers ? As: is this really a worldwide epidemic or , the sky is falling ?
    Tooold

    The answer to your question can be found in the original research and in the SAS report. To save you the trouble of reading them I can tell you the answer is that 1.5% - 3%* of the control group (non-surfers) were harbouring antibiotic resistant E. coli. Or as the SAS report put it:

    Regular surfers and bodyboarders are three times more likely to have antibiotic resistant E. coli in their guts than non-surfers,’

    We can all make our own judgements as to whether this is a problem, but as I'm sure you'll agree, it’s important that research is done to provide the evidence on which we base our opinions.

    Edit *depending on the type of E. coli.
    Last edited by MartinJ; 9th February 2018 at 03:42 AM.

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