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  1. #8
    That makes sense now.
    Modern shorter boards are sailed with a more upright stance – and that means the mast foot is set further back along the board and the front footstrap sets you closer to it.

    That positioning puts more bodyweight on the front foot and less load on the back foot – which in turn should help you plane earlier and will help keep the board level.

    But what happens is that set up also feels more 'catapulty' at first – and so it takes a while getting used to the new stance required.
    You should still be able to load up the fin via the back foot to achieve faster speeds, and that will be achieved by you raking back the rig once up to planing speed.
    With some load on your back hand from the rig, you should be able to load up the back foot.

    It's still not clear to me why you might prefer a double back strap over the single strap set up – from a security point of view – but the likely solution is to go back to the single strap and sail the board more until you are used to it.

    Don't make the mistake of shifting the mast foot forwards in an attempt to return to your old stance. Start with the mast foot centre track, regardless of sail size used.

    The other thing to add is that this (modern) upright stance goes hand in hand with longer harness lines – 28inch minimum.
    Last edited by basher; 9th March 2018 at 02:54 PM.
    Now back in the UK.

  2. #9
    Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by basher View Post
    That makes sense now.
    Modern shorter boards are sailed with a more upright stance – and that means the mast foot is set further back along the board and the front footstrap sets you closer to it.

    That positioning puts more bodyweight on the front foot and less load on the back foot – which in turn should help you plane earlier and will help keep the board level.

    But what happens is that set up also feels more 'catapulty' at first – and so it takes a while getting used to the new stance required.
    You should still be able to load up the fin via the back foot to achieve faster speeds, and that will be achieved by you raking back the rig once up to planing speed.
    With some load on your back hand from the rig, you should be able to load up the back foot.

    It's still not clear to me why you might prefer a double back strap over the single strap set up – from a security point of view – but the likely solution is to go back to the single strap and sail the board more until you are used to it.

    Don't make the mistake of shifting the mast foot forwards in an attempt to return to your old stance. Start with the mast foot centre track, regardless of sail size used.

    The other thing to add is that this (modern) upright stance goes hand in hand with longer harness lines – 28inch minimum.
    Hello Basher, and thank you for your reply!

    I sent you a reply to your previous post but I have seen it has not been published...

    With the double back strap, I keep my back foot more near the rail and I am able to push on the fin, as well as feeling more power on my back foot. But i really don't like to have a double back strap on a FW board.

    I think I have to improve my surfing position...

  3. #10
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    dforce

    The forum's anti-spam software moderated your opening post which I recovered, and your last two posts now also recovered.

    Sorry about this, I don't know why it happens. I'll watch out for any more deleted posts. It should get used to you as you post more!

  4. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by MartinJ View Post
    dforce

    The forum's anti-spam software moderated your opening post which I recovered, and your last two posts now also recovered.

    Sorry about this, I don't know why it happens. I'll watch out for any more deleted posts. It should get used to you as you post more!
    Thank you Martin!

  5. #12
    Senior Member Gorgesailor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dforce View Post
    Hello Basher, and thank you for your reply!

    I sent you a reply to your previous post but I have seen it has not been published...

    With the double back strap, I keep my back foot more near the rail and I am able to push on the fin, as well as feeling more power on my back foot. But i really don't like to have a double back strap on a FW board.

    I think I have to improve my surfing position...
    You may need to raise your boom a bit as well. What generation are your sails? This can affect stance some as well. Newer sails tend to have more forward C.O.E....

  6. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gorgesailor View Post
    You may need to raise your boom a bit as well. What generation are your sails? This can affect stance some as well. Newer sails tend to have more forward C.O.E....
    Hello Gorgesailor, my sails are from 2013 to 2016 model year.

    I think I have to completely change my way of surfing. Also raising the boom and using a longer harness lines and consequently change my body position on the board.

    It is quite difficult for me because I passed from a windsurf of first 2000 years to the last one, so the evolution step of the material is wide and I need to get in confidence again...

    The only thing I am happy is not a matter of material as I have:

    JP Australia Freestyle wave MY2013 101 liter that I use with Naish sails 5.3 and 6.2
    and a
    JP Australia Wave Slate 78 MY2017 that I use with Naish sails 4.7 and 4.0

  7. #14
    Senior Member
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    What you describe is mostly a bout tuning and then a little about modifying your stance to suit. Shorter wider boards are sailed with more pressure on the front foot than the back foot. The quickest way to rebalance the pressure between front and back foot is with boom height ( noting that mast foot position also impacts on boom height). On boards like yours the back foot does little more than help to trim the board ( keep it flat rail to rail). Given your FSW is one of the larger sizes and also considering the sails you use with it I suggest the following set up.
    1. Move the front straps a little more outboard
    2. 28 inch lines should be a bout right
    3. set boom height so that there is more pressure on the front foot than rear foot (lower to add front foot pressure....higher to reduce front foot pressure)
    4. Keep back strapopen so that your foot crosses the centre line of the board
    5. Mast foot at centre should be a bout right for the 6.2...maybe back just a tad for the 5.3.
    6. Set the sail close to max downhaul.....a wider board helps with low end power but needs a sail breathing well at higher speeds.....an overpowered sail will put unwanted pressure on your back foot.

    Check you stance once planing. about 70% of the pressure should be on your front foot pushing both down against the wide section of the board and forward. You should be relatively upright rather than hiked out.

    You mentioned driving upwind. A wider shorter board with tucked rails and a rounded outline rather than parallel rails cannot be pushed upwind using the grip of the rails and with lots of back foot pressure.....so you need to experiment with different approaches. You main weapon is speed...so don't stuff too far upwind...try weaving to and away from the wind using the channels between swell. Angle the board slightly to leeward using the back foot..........don't push hard with the back foot...it does not work unless you have a big fin.
    Last edited by mikerb; 13th March 2018 at 08:46 PM.

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