O.K. I'm back with some more ideas.....We had almost no wind at all this summer where I windsurf and so I could not very well test my fin against others, the reason being that almost no one else ever came out because the wind was so low. I myself sailed many days and was able to plane due to my modified fly-fin. Because of the very low wind I was not able to go down 2 sail sizes as I hoped, but I did use a 7.5 almost exclusively rather than my usual 8.5! The few times other good windsurfers were out and could not plane, they just passed it off as "Oh, you always plane earlier because you're so light." Also my results were not as amazing as in Cuba because the fin which worked so well on the 130l. Bic was not quite large enough for the 140l. wider Starboard Carve. As a side note it was useless on my wife's 140l. Starboard Go, I believe because of the double concave board bottom where the moment force was pressing the board against the water....

After learning some more wing aerodynamics, I realized the swept back wing was actually putting most of the lift on the wrong side of the board! This explained the reason for flipping over in the middle of the jibe. The 50 cm. length of the fin was putting the lift on the proper side, however, and so the fin was working O.K. I mounted the fin backwards to test forward swept wing and even though almost everything was wrong, OMG the lift was enormous! In the outboard straps and leaning far into the wind, I could not bring the windward rail down to within even 1 foot of the water!

Of course forward swept wings have 2 large disadvantages: Yaw instability and Aerolasticity. In planes, the wings want to lift up so hard they break off. So I tried to combine the advantages of forward sweep (inward spanwise flow and lift on the windward side) and backward sweep.(yaw stability, pitch stability, and less aerolasticity) I came up with a gull wing design and hoped I could get Stepan from FRP to make it for me. But no such luck. So I made one myself out of wood and I'm heading to Cuba in January to test it out.