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  1. #1
    Senior Member FKPhil's Avatar
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    Carve gybe getting a full 180

    I still struggle with overpowered carved gybes but was chuffed yesterday I made all but one of my gybes in such conditions.
    Main problem now is getting the board to turn that last 45 before rig flip when Im clew first and trying to maintain the correct foot pressure when the power comes back in the sail. Ive tried over sheeting & under sheeting but cant crack either.
    Any tips or just more practice?
    Writing nonsense on tinternet since 1842.

  2. #2
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    Its difficult to comment without some video/photos as we dont know what you are currently doing. What size sail and board are you using? If its 6.5m+ forget the clew first sailing, the rig should have been started to flip before turning dead down wind. The only time I sail clew first with any sail is if I have mucked it up or on smaller kit and am trying to delay the rig flip to coincide with going down a bit of swell/chop.
    Last edited by phil_in_poole; 1st April 2018 at 12:54 PM.

  3. #3
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    The other thing is to remember to keep the board carving once you have done your foot change. I assume you are doing a step gybe and not strap to strap.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Silicon Beach's Avatar
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    To keep the board turning in the last past of a carve gybe (after the feet and rig change) you have to use heel pressure instead of toe side pressure ... and if it's windy, choppy, overpowered, or on a swell bend ze knees and sink down low even more.

    It just so happens that a friend got a little clip of me gybing a couple of days ago ... I was well / over powered on my 3.7m Blade and SuperMini 85, and it was lot windier and choppier than it looks on this video ...

    https://www.facebook.com/steven.cart...470093536/?t=3
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    Currently writing the World's first Windsurfing Novel: 'Too Close to the Wind' - watch this space!
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  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by FKPhil View Post
    ...overpowered carved gybes....problem now is getting the board to turn that last 45 before rig flip when I’m clew firs......
    hanging on to rig too long discourages board turning, especially if overpowered. After building up speed bearing off start turn. Look into turn to make sure board is banked enough, count to 2 give sail a small push with back hand and leave go, just like expert SB does in his excellently shot video :-)
    Boards: F2 Gorilla 76, Tabou Quadster 86, Fanatic Triwave 95, Starboard Kombatwave 96, F2 Stoke 115, JPFreeRace 125, Sails: Gaastra Poison 4.2, North Hero 4.2, North Ice 4.7, Simmer Icon 5.3, Gaastra Cross 6, Ezzy Elite 6.1, Tushingham Storm 6.5, Severne Turbo 7.5

  6. #6
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    Maybe stop thinking about a carve gybe being 180 degrees!! Aim to come out on a broad reach and complete the 180 by then going upwind. In overpowered conditions the board has enough momentum to surf from broad reach to broad reach so no need for clew first sailing......in fact the rig can be depowered throughout if need be. Better to get the rig powered up on the new broad reach as soon as possible to maintain control. I mostly do strap to strap gybes.........maybe not ideal with bigger sails or for racing but on smaller kit in stronger wind it does give the advantage of maintaining the same foot position and pressure on the rail until after the rig change.....and it makes you flip the rig earlier.

  7. #7
    There are plenty of competent gybers at my beach but I noticed that some of them still get round with a straight leg stance.
    That means they have learnt to load the inner rail for the turn by using rig load – which transfers rig power down your carving leg via your back hand. But that method also means when you sheet out or flip the rig the power on the rail goes, so the carving stops in the latter part of the turn.

    The straight leg gyber also loses speed in the latter part of the turn, because he is not leaning forward enough, and so the tail sinks once power is released.


    What's missing is the better stance – with bent knees that allow the sailor to lean forward more. If you are overpowered then there is no reason for the carving to stop mid gybe, and all you need do is maintain weight on the inner rail. Bend the knees more, and lean forward over the rig, fully loading the inner rail by sheeting in as you go into the turn. It helps to put your back hand down the boom a bit – both to increase rig load on your carving leg, and to get the rig more forwards.


    If fully powered then your foot change should happen after the rig flip. If not fully powered then you change feet before the rig flip (step gybe). The goal is to keep the board level throughout the turn.


    A fully cranked turn is also called a power gybe. Not only are you leaning forwards over the rig as you enter the turn, but you can also sweep the rig backwards towards the tail a bit, to tighten the last part of the turn before flipping the rig.
    The rig flip then happens fast and you should be sheeting in with full power on the other side, ready to plane away.


    When overpowered you ditch this power in a turn in several ways: One by keeping planing. Two, by cranking the rig over to be more horizontal – and this is where the stance commitment is required. Without stance commitment you'll probably have to sheet out.



    The other thing to note is that a gybe is not necessarily a U turn, and so you don't have to turn through 180 degrees all at once – try bearing off to a broader reach, then gybe through 120 degrees, then once up to speed luff up to a higher setting to get back to where you originally came from.
    Many people make the mistake of getting through the gybe but luffing up on the new side to almost stop, and then they have to bear away again to get going.

    The fastest or most efficient gybing arc is usually one which works with the wave or chop conditions you have – because the board keeps planing more readily going down a wave face than when heading up one or bashing into one.
    Last edited by basher; 2nd April 2018 at 12:36 PM.
    Now back in the UK.

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