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Thread: Light wind gybe

  1. #8
    Cue short sentence: I don't think anybody mentioned longboards.
    Now back in the UK.

  2. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    678
    Not being an expert but defo better with big kit than small. In light winds you have no chance of making it around on the plane so I slam it in tight and hard and then pump out. (oh err missus).

  3. #10
    Senior Member
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    Nov 2009
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    I know exactly what you mean and I reckon SBs comments earlier are about right.
    I use most sail sizes and after a period of using small sails it invariably takes me a little while to remember how to get round "elegantly" with a big sail in marginal conditions....in my case further compounded by using a 84cm wide board.
    My tips would be

    1. Look for a gust/windy section if possible for the gybe.
    2. Don't bear away more than a few degrees from a beam reach. If it is marginal you usually go slower as you go broader.
    3. Be very careful to stay fully sheeted in initially as you come over the board.....when sailing largely on apparent wind the rig angle is very sensitive.
    4. BUT....then feed the sail out quicker than you would do in windier conditions ( sail size irrelevant here). If you stay sheeted in too long the sail will start working against you because you lose the apparent wind quickly in favour of the real wind angle. In extreme cases the sail can even back wind ( yes we have all been there!!)
    5. Give the board a gentle arc and release the rig early to come out on a broad reach........then be careful not to grab too big a handful of back hand cos that will stall the sail and push the nose into wind.
    6. Last one.....this may or may not work on different shape boards........on my board I use a gybing/rail foot position slightly forward of where I would place it in windier conditions just to avoid sinking the tail.................Oh ....and I strap gybe!!

  4. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
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    1,247
    thanks for the advice guys
    Boards: F2 Gorilla 76, Tabou Quadster 86, Fanatic Triwave 95, Starboard Kombatwave 96, F2 Stoke 115, JPFreeRace 125, Sails: Gaastra Poison 4.2, North Hero 4.2, North Ice 4.7, Simmer Icon 5.3, Gaastra Cross 6, Ezzy Elite 6.1, Tushingham Storm 6.5, Severne Turbo 7.5

  5. #12
    Senior Member
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    Nov 2009
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    On smaller boards in sub planning conditions I find it is a lot more wobbly to try to float around slowly. For me a better bet is to pump to get a bit of speed and then get back on the tail to spin the board a round with the mast angled forwards anda wide grip on the boom (think this what Grumph was saying). It does mean getting forward again very quickly once the board has turned, and keeping whatever power there is in the sail until you are back in a balanced position...then flip the rig on a broad reach.

    Or tack!!

  6. #13
    On the light wind gybe question, the key thing is what happens when you are not planing – because you can no longer carve the board.

    What you then do to turn will vary according to what board you are on, and how wobbly it is – and turning a sinky waveboard in light wind is very wobbly, whereas a bigger slalom board offers more stability through float and width.

    The rig is used to turn the board – and hence the generic name flare gybe. At displacement speeds you are putting the centre of effort of the sail well to one side of the board and that's what initiates the turn.

    You can speed up a turn by sinking the tail, so that the board stops and pivots on the tail – hence the other names of pivot gybe or slam gybe. Obviously you step back or lean back to initiate this, but you then have to level the board again fast once you are clew first with a leg shift for the new tack.
    While the board tail is half underwater you can also push the tail round faster with body weight but that's a contorted body move given what you are trying to do with the rig.
    The wide grip on the boom recommended is so that you can shift the rig across the board more easily when it's almost square to the wind, and then you can also shuffle the boom through your hands for the rig flip..

    As with all windsurf turns, you do it better after some practice, because you soon get to know when to move weight and when you can rely on wind load in your sail.

    In light winds it may be best to practice this with a non-cammed sail because reversing the cams in very light winds can be an added complication.




    For any newbies or intermediates reading this:

    Type 'gybe windsurfer' into YouTube and you will find many instructional videos for planing and non-planing gybes. Pick the ones narrated by known windsurf instructors.
    If you have problems with any particular gybe yourself then the best way to find out what's going wrong is to get someone to video you, and then get an expert to take a look. That saves a lot of words on any internet page.
    Now back in the UK.

  7. #14
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    Nov 2009
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    3,876
    ..........think I just said all that!

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