Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3
Results 15 to 20 of 20

Thread: Light wind gybe

  1. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,376
    I like this video.

    https://youtu.be/I3L4l7pSV2A


    Regarding pushing with the back hand to help speed up flipping the rig I've found that tends to just backwind the sail. Once you have done the step your front hand is over the centre line and if you slide it down the boom to the mast then you can forcefully pull the rig in front of you.

    ps forgot to add these stills from the video. Especially in light winds, once you have started carving you lose speed quickly so you need to be quick with the rig flip so you can sheet in and get on the power again.


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Nick gybe 1.jpg 
Views:	27 
Size:	87.9 KB 
ID:	16126Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Nick gybe 2.jpg 
Views:	18 
Size:	88.2 KB 
ID:	16127Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Nick gybe 3.jpg 
Views:	19 
Size:	88.2 KB 
ID:	16128
    Last edited by phil_in_poole; 24th April 2018 at 08:55 PM.

  2. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,376
    Quote Originally Posted by Maker View Post
    Last tSunday I had a nice sail on 125 JP FreeRce and first time with 7.5m twin-cam. I was pleased, amazed, that sail got me going in such light winds..
    Out of interest, is that the latest JP Freerace 125? They look more like a full-on slalom board compared to the previous version. I had a go on the previous one and it had a relatively long planing flat so didnt need to be started off the wind to get going. If the new board has a shorter planing flat it probably does need to be started off the wind, so when gybing dont wait too long after the gybe to pump and accelerate.
    As Richarli said, if you are in light winds and are only just about planing you have little chance of planing gybes.

  3. #17
    That is a good video, but I'm not sure I'd describe it as a 'light wind' gybe, given that he (Dempsey) looks fully powered.
    Now back in the UK.

  4. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,376
    Quote Originally Posted by basher View Post
    That is a good video, but I'm not sure I'd describe it as a 'light wind' gybe, given that he (Dempsey) looks fully powered.
    Thats not fully powered, not what I'd call fully powered anyway. I cant see that many white horses in the Easterly wind at Portland, not much chop either. If you look closely he sometimes pumps the rig just before entering the gybe. Anyway, those key principles still apply in light wind gybes.

    I cant think of anything extra to do in light wind large sail gybes. Maybe gybe slightly tighter than on smaller kit so there is less time without power in the sail. I checked the radius of this gybe (8.5m sail) and its only slightly less than my normal full power gybe on a 7.5m.


    https://youtu.be/vDeulGC-nNM

  5. #19
    No worries Phil. I was just referring to Maker's opening post where he asks about light winds, and about loss of speed during the gybe.

    That needn't happen when you are fully powered.

    When you are not fully powered you just have to pump into the turn, head down any wave, and hope to keep speed as best as you can.
    But some light wind turns will result in dropping off the plane – as we so often see at gybe marks in light wind events with the PWA.


    I think the key is to feel what (apparent) wind there is in the sail and that determines sheeting angle and when to flip the rig – and when to pump.
    Last edited by basher; 25th April 2018 at 12:09 AM.
    Now back in the UK.

  6. #20
    Senior Member jknhismassivevan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Swindon
    Posts
    1,947
    Hi Maker

    I've just sent you a message with a link to a drone video a friend of mine filmed in Langstone Harbour of me at 100Kg in 10-14knts on my 8.6 Racing Blade and Manta 85CM 135L. I'm a very active sailor which means I pump like crazy and shift my weight around to get the best out of conditions and for light wind conditions that's the key every time.

    For light wind conditions you have to adapt your normal gybing technique to one that reflects the lighter wind durrrrrrr! My technique that sees me planning out of any gybe that its possible to plane out of is to make the first half of the turn quite rapidly whilst still sheeted, then focus on a fast rig flip that doesn't stall you and then quite a deep exit whilst letting the rig settle down and the speed build, its a feel thing and you do have to be more patient than when sailing fully powered up.

    There is an element of picking you spot to gybe as well, in the video I gybe close to the seawall as I know that there is a bit more wind there, not much but it can make the difference.
    The Windsurfer Formally Known as JKRR - TWFKJKRR or "Him in the Red Shorts"

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •